Light elements.

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Light elements.
« on: April 26, 2008, 08:11:30 AM »
What happens to any light elements, especially something like helium, that we or some natural force puts into the atmosphere? In RET, such elements are light enough to exceed the escape velocity of the planet if given sufficient energy from the Sun, but in a FE model, the escape velocity is essentially infinite, so no gas should escape. The only alternative would be to have the elements drifting off towards the South Pole, but that just brings up the question of why the rest of the atmosphere doesn't follow it.

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ConicalEarthSociety

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Re: Light elements.
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2008, 08:14:31 AM »
Just read my signature for the answer.

Thank you.

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Bushido

Re: Light elements.
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2008, 08:15:07 AM »
Boltzmann distribution:

n = n0 exp(-m g/k T)

The lighter the molecules (i.e. the smaller the m, the slower the distribution decays, and, hence, there is a higher percentage of light elements at higher altitudes.

Re: Light elements.
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2008, 04:14:07 PM »
Quote
Boltzmann distribution:

n = n0 exp(-m g/k T)

The lighter the molecules (i.e. the smaller the m, the slower the distribution decays, and, hence, there is a higher percentage of light elements at higher altitudes.

Whilst it is true that lighter elements will rise, and that the uppermost portion of the terrestrial atmosphere is composed mainly of hydrogen and helium, it's very tenuous and contains nowhere near the amount of light elements you would expect.

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Bushido

Re: Light elements.
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2008, 04:37:31 PM »
Measuered data with cited source or it didn't happen.