Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth

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Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« on: December 07, 2007, 03:09:59 PM »
Out of interest, what evidence is there that the center of the earth is at the North pole? Wouldn't the idea of the south pole being the center be just as valid? The mechanics of the flat earth seem to be particularly effective at preventing people from detecting whether they are in the inner half or outer half of the circle, so why does every map suggest that the Northern hemisphere is the inner section of the circle?

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2007, 03:31:38 PM »
Because the 'North pole' is in the center.  I'd assume travel would have something to do with evidence, but don't hold me to it.

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Tom Bishop

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Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2007, 05:32:17 PM »
From Proof 78 of "One Hundred Proofs the Earth is Not a Globe" we read:

    "Yes, but we can circumnavigate the South easily enough," is often said by those who don't know, The British Ship Challenger recently completed the circuit of the Southern region - indirectly, to be sure - but she was three years about it, and traversed nearly 69,000 miles - a stretch long enough to have taken her six times round on the globular hypothesis. This is a proof that Earth is not a globe.

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2007, 05:42:21 PM »
From Proof 78 of "One Hundred Proofs the Earth is Not a Globe" we read:

    "Yes, but we can circumnavigate the South easily enough," is often said by those who don't know, The British Ship Challenger recently completed the circuit of the Southern region - indirectly, to be sure - but she was three years about it, and traversed nearly 69,000 miles - a stretch long enough to have taken her six times round on the globular hypothesis. This is a proof that Earth is not a globe.


Tom that was nearly 135 years ago and the voyage from Portsmouth was 69,000 miles:

The Challenger expedition was a scientific circumnavigation of the world that lasted almost four years and traversed 69,000 miles. Challenger left Portsmouth, England, in December 1872 and returned in May 1876, having traveled as far as the Great Ice Barrier of Antarctica, visiting Nova Scotia, the Caribbean, and South Africa in the process, before pushing on into the Pacific, visiting Indonesia and passing not far from the Caroline Islands where I would one day undergo my own personal and scientific voyage of discovery. From the southwestern Pacific, Challenger headed north to Hawaii, then south again before passing back into the Atlantic through the narrow straits at Tierra del Fuego. The homeward stretch took her up through the Atlantic, into the Channel and then, finally, home again. In the course of its epic 69,000 mile voyage fully a quarter of Challenger's crew complement of 269 deserted, distressed by confinement in a ship that was only 200 feet long and 40 feet wide and demoralized by the endless repetitive grind of dredging the seabed and retrieving what looked to the untutored eye like lumps of mud.

from   http://www.richardcorfield.com/pages/books/silent_landscape/archives/silent_landscape_extracts_00.htm


Come on that was ludicrous , how can anyone take your claims seriously if you don't research them?

Edit: 100 to 135 years

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2007, 05:45:08 PM »
That casts severe doubts on the accuracy of  "One Hundred Proofs the Earth is Not a Globe"  as a whole.

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Tom Bishop

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Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2007, 05:45:25 PM »
Quote
Come on that was ludicrous , how can anyone take your claims seriously if you don't research them?

What part of that says that the HMS Challenger did not make a circuit of the southern polar region?

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Tom that was nearly 100 years ago and the voyage from Portsmouth was 69,000 miles:

Only data older than 100 years can be trusted to be untainted by the Conspiracy.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2007, 05:51:07 PM by Tom Bishop »

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2007, 05:50:20 PM »

Only data older than 100 years can be trusted to be untainted by the Conspiracy.

OK, if you insist.

That does not mean that it was 69,000 miles to circumnavigate Antarctica . Your claim in that regard is incorrect.In fact it puts a substantially smaller upper limit to length of the coast line if you take into account his other travels.
Infact you could claim it to be proof of a round Earth.

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2007, 06:26:46 PM »

What part of that says that the HMS Challenger did not make a circuit of the southern polar region?


None but the coastline upper limit has to be 69,000 minus a two way trip to England and minus his other travels if he did circumnavigate.

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2007, 01:24:26 AM »
If we leave out the...questionable evidence of trips around the southern hemisphere, there's still evidence that the flat Earth is based around the south pole. Antarctica contains fossils from a time when it was warmer, which suggests that at one point it was closer to the equator. this would work fine in a south pole based FE model, as Antarctica is free to move around with continental drift, moving from warmer to colder places, and fitting in nicely in Pangaea. With a north based model, Antarctica is this vast ring of mountains, apparently completely immobile in continental drift and incapable of becoming warm enough to support the fossils it holds. It also leaves a huge hole in Pangaea where Antarctica would be.

There's also the fact that there's a lot more sea in the southern hemisphere than the northern hemisphere. With the North pole model, you end up with Australia, south Africa and South America either stretched out of proportion or separated by insane amounts of sea. A south pole based model would give a lot smoother land coverage.

Finally, there's a lot more researchers at the South pole than the north pole, along with a larger number of tourists and other civilians. The idea of the North pole based model might have been planted by this vast, world spanning conspiracy, so that when people go to the south pole to look for themselves, they found no edge and thus assume the world is round. They are free to circumnavigate the south pole as many times as they like, with the people running the conspiracy safe in the knowledge that nobody will check that the North pole is the same, due to the fact that the north pole is far more difficult to circumnavigate via sea.

Of course, I still believe that the Earth is a globe. Not that it affects me in any way, but everything seems more logical that way.

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John Davis

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Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2007, 02:25:20 AM »
I have an idea about flat earth geography, but its still just an idea.  Here it is:

Before I start, here is a useful diagram:


I call this phenomenon the world-view state collapse.  First, I will briefly remind you what this work postulates and then explain in more detail about this collapse.

The world exists in an infinite amount of  “states.”  Each of these can be represented as a space of vectors of information and qualities corresponding to all the mass in the earth (or even universe.)  We will denote these spaces as |i>.  These states are alternate between states where the Earth has the geographic south pole at the geographic center of the disk, and those in which it has the geographic north pole in the geographic center of the disk.  When one passes through the outer lying pole (for example, in a state with the north pole in the center, when one passes through the south pole)  one passes to the next state.  The state class with the north pole geographically in the center is denoted by Φ, and that with the south pole geographically centered is denoted by Θ.

Once one observes this, it collapses into a single state, |θ>.  And so we see, |θ> = (Σ |i>)/n where |i> is the alternating of states comprised of  Θ and  Φ.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2007, 02:32:04 AM by Username »
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2007, 11:42:01 AM »
I tried to understand the mathematics you used there, but as far as I can tell, it seems complete nonsense. I guess it's a little out of my league. The only result I could get out of it is that you've got some kind sum to infinity, that's either going to total to, when observed, infinity or zero.

I've provided a small, poorly drawn diagram of what I mean in terms of a south pole based flat earth, in case anyone wasn't getting what I was going on about.

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John Davis

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Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2007, 11:57:25 AM »
Its just the average of all of the states, which in the end is the average of two states, one which is flat with a south pole in the center and one which is falt with a north pole in the center.

Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2007, 02:13:22 PM »
...I'm fairly certain that you can't find the median average or the mode average of an infinite series, and the mean average would just be, well, the mean of the two, not one or the other.

Personally I'm skeptical of the state collapsing when observed as well, as the state is under constant observation...

Perhaps Flat Earth mathematics operate in a different way to the kind we normally use...

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John Davis

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Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2007, 03:21:56 PM »
You can solve it by using induction since there are only two states. 

It is also constantly collapsing/collapsed.  I will make a useful animation when I get the time and when I'm on a computer with the proper software.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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ﮎingulaЯiτy

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Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2007, 03:41:53 PM »
Out of interest, what evidence is there that the center of the earth is at the North pole? Wouldn't the idea of the south pole being the center be just as valid? The mechanics of the flat earth seem to be particularly effective at preventing people from detecting whether they are in the inner half or outer half of the circle, so why does every map suggest that the Northern hemisphere is the inner section of the circle?

They chose the North Pole because the South Pole would look like this:
If I was asked to imagine a perfect deity, I would never invent one that suffers from a multiple personality disorder. Christians get points for originality there.

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2007, 02:09:33 AM »
Quote
They chose the North Pole because the South Pole would look like this:

It seems no worse than having the southern hemisphere stretched out of proportion.

It just makes me wonder. If you don't trust the measurements given for the southern hemisphere, why do you trust the ones given for the northern hemisphere? How do you know Russia doesn't stretch 30,000 kilometers around the world? After all, Russia is part of this conspiracy. South America, Australia and Africa aren't, but they never seem to complain that their county is twice as big as the maps show.

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Chris Spaghetti

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Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2007, 05:26:43 AM »
Out of interest, what evidence is there that the center of the earth is at the North pole? Wouldn't the idea of the south pole being the center be just as valid? The mechanics of the flat earth seem to be particularly effective at preventing people from detecting whether they are in the inner half or outer half of the circle, so why does every map suggest that the Northern hemisphere is the inner section of the circle?

They chose the North Pole because the South Pole would look like this:

is that my South FE or did you make your own?

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Dioptimus Drime

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Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2007, 09:45:27 AM »
People can and have gone across, around, over, and through the North pole in order to get to the other side of the Earth. It's thusly necessary to assume that the ice wall's placement is not there. Antarctica on the other hand, is mostly uninhabited (other than the scientists who are assumed to work around there), and relatively unexplored.


~D-Draw

Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2007, 02:32:33 PM »
I suppose that if there's reliable evidence for flights and treks across the North pole, and only unreliable evidence for flights and treks across the South pole, I guess that disproves an inverse flat Earth.

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ﮎingulaЯiτy

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Re: Question regarding the layout of the Flat Earth
« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2007, 03:05:48 PM »
Out of interest, what evidence is there that the center of the earth is at the North pole? Wouldn't the idea of the south pole being the center be just as valid? The mechanics of the flat earth seem to be particularly effective at preventing people from detecting whether they are in the inner half or outer half of the circle, so why does every map suggest that the Northern hemisphere is the inner section of the circle?

They chose the North Pole because the South Pole would look like this:

is that my South FE or did you make your own?

It's more than likely yours. I have a folder dedicated the relevant graphics on this site. Failing to properly document them, I have no recollection of this one's origin.
If I was asked to imagine a perfect deity, I would never invent one that suffers from a multiple personality disorder. Christians get points for originality there.