Why is Gully afraid?

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divito the truthist

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Re: Why is Gully afraid?
« Reply #90 on: October 13, 2007, 10:45:33 AM »
Wikipedia is one source. I'll concede it if you really don't want to use it.

My post also contains three more sources, the links and quotes being contained in my post with one of those being a response from a physicist. If you wish, I'll retrieve more sources backing it up.
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Re: Why is Gully afraid?
« Reply #91 on: October 13, 2007, 11:01:28 AM »
yes I later saw and acknowledged you had 3 sources. Before you go find more, please first give me your thoughts on this quote from one of your sources.

Quote

So the simplest explanation is to assume that, peculiar though it may be, gravity -- although a perfectly real force -- acts as though it is a fictitious force. No other real force is known to act in this way, but perhaps gravity is "special", and it is merely a coincidence that it looks like a fictitious force.


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Loard Z

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Re: Why is Gully afraid?
« Reply #92 on: October 13, 2007, 11:05:50 AM »
What about "The Force" ?
if i remember, austria is an old, dis-used name for what is now Germany.
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Roundy the Truthinessist

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Re: Why is Gully afraid?
« Reply #93 on: October 13, 2007, 11:15:56 AM »
yes I later saw and acknowledged you had 3 sources. Before you go find more, please first give me your thoughts on this quote from one of your sources.

Quote

So the simplest explanation is to assume that, peculiar though it may be, gravity -- although a perfectly real force -- acts as though it is a fictitious force. No other real force is known to act in this way, but perhaps gravity is "special", and it is merely a coincidence that it looks like a fictitious force.


You took the quote out of context.  Here it is again, only in context:

Quote
     The fact that gravity, like fictitious forces, involves a constant acceleration, makes us wonder whether gravity could be a fictitious force. It's hard to imagine that anything so pervasive and seemingly real could be "fictitious", but the forces experienced by the person in the accelerated car feel real, and are presumably fictitious. Is there some way that we could create the phenomenon of gravity, without the force?
     There is indeed such a way. Suppose that you were in a rocket ship, headed upwards at the acceleration of gravity, so that anything not attached to the ship seems to "fall" with a mirror image of that upward acceleration. Then every such object would fall toward the back of the ship, at the acceleration of gravity, and trying to stop such a fall would require a force, in the direction of the acceleration, proportional to the object's mass, which would be equal to, and appear to be, its real weight.
     Of course, we can't explain gravity in that way, as that would require every part of the Earth to be accelerating upward and outward, which would make the Earth bigger and bigger, which is not observed. So the simplest explanation is to assume that, peculiar though it may be, gravity -- although a perfectly real force -- acts as though it is a fictitious force. No other real force is known to act in this way, but perhaps gravity is "special", and it is merely a coincidence that it looks like a fictitious force.
     The strange and in some ways disturbing answer to this supposition is that the phenomenon of gravity (the fact that things fall, and have weight) is real, but the force of gravity, as described by Newton, is not a real force, but a fictitious force. According to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, gravity is a curvature of space-time such that in the future, things are closer together than they are now, even if they are moving in straight, parallel lines, with no force between them. For in curved space-time, there is no such thing as a straight line, but instead, only curved lines, called geodesics, which are the straightest possible paths in curved space-time, but are always and inexorably curved. (for now, see the chapter on black holes and general relativity in the text for a more detailed discussion) And since curved paths, in our experience, require some centripetal force to create them, the motion of things along geodesics seems to require some force to explain the acceleration observed, as a result of that curvature.
     So we see things falling, with an acceleration which we call the acceleration of gravity, and thinking that we live in a straight-line, uniformly moving or stationary inertial reference frame, we attribute that acceleration to a force, the force of gravity. Whereas in reality, objects falling toward the Earth are moving along geodesic paths, with no acceleration, and according to a modified version of the Law of Inertia (objects which are at rest tend to remain at rest, and objects which are moving tend to move along geodesic paths with uniform motion, unless some force acts on them), have no force acting on them. They fall simply because the curved space-time near the Earth makes it natural for them to be closer to us in the future, than they are now.

Notice how the very next line explains why that supposition is incorrect.  Just because the article is categorizing that as the simplest explanation doesn't mean it is equating it with being the correct explanation.

It's like, I could say that the simplest explanation for the fact that the earth looks flat is that it is, in fact, flat; but that doesn't necessarily mean it is the correct explanation for why the earth looks flat.

You should try reading an entire article sometime, rather than random sentences.  Your level of comprehension will just zoom upwards.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2007, 11:18:42 AM by Roundylicious »
Where did you educate the biology, in toulet?

Re: Why is Gully afraid?
« Reply #94 on: October 13, 2007, 11:32:16 AM »
I didn't even read that next part. I wasn't expecting him to take it back.

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Roundy the Truthinessist

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Re: Why is Gully afraid?
« Reply #95 on: October 13, 2007, 11:33:20 AM »
I didn't even read that next part.

Well, obviously.  ::)
Where did you educate the biology, in toulet?

Re: Why is Gully afraid?
« Reply #96 on: October 13, 2007, 11:44:18 AM »
I'm just saying I wasn't trying to be deceitful.

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Roundy the Truthinessist

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Re: Why is Gully afraid?
« Reply #97 on: October 13, 2007, 11:45:02 AM »
I never even suggested you were.
Where did you educate the biology, in toulet?

Re: Why is Gully afraid?
« Reply #98 on: October 13, 2007, 11:53:37 AM »
I know. Others might have thought so.