Sketipical Physics

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2007, 02:54:09 PM »
luckily the thread title is skeptical physics and not fake physics, otherwise you would be right.
While dropping items off the Eiffel tower does show mass doesn't matter,  mass of the earth does.  Variations in gravitation are found everywhere. 

They're caused by experimental error. I have personally tested for variation by altitude and found no significant discrepancy.
Show us your proof and your documented experimental results.

Here's ours: USGS

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James

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2007, 03:00:39 PM »
Show us your proof and your documented experimental results.

Here's ours: USGS

It wasn't written up except by the temporary jotting down of results for times. Next time we'll be sure and generate presentable documentation.
"For your own sake, as well as for that of our beloved country, be bold and firm against error and evil of every kind." - David Wardlaw Scott, Terra Firma 1901

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #32 on: August 01, 2007, 03:26:02 PM »
Show us your proof and your documented experimental results.

Here's ours: USGS

It wasn't written up except by the temporary jotting down of results for times. Next time we'll be sure and generate presentable documentation.
I see the old "the dog ate my homework" excuse. How novel!

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Tom Bishop

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2007, 03:51:32 PM »
Quote
I see the old "the dog ate my homework" excuse. How novel!

I don't see any listing of experimental result in that brief PDF file. In fact, I've never seen a paper detailing the difference of g at different altitudes.

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2007, 03:57:18 PM »
Quote
I see the old "the dog ate my homework" excuse. How novel!

I don't see any listing of experimental result in that brief PDF file. In fact, I've never seen a paper detailing the difference of g at different altitudes.
Follow the links, pal. There's more than enough USGS data on gravity measurements. And we've already had this discussion and you left the thread in your usual cowardly manner.

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Roundy the Truthinessist

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #35 on: August 01, 2007, 04:00:54 PM »
So this is from a government source?  ::)
Where did you educate the biology, in toulet?

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Tom Bishop

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2007, 04:28:45 PM »
Quote
Follow the links, pal. There's more than enough USGS data on gravity measurements. And we've already had this discussion and you left the thread in your usual cowardly manner.

There are no links in the PDF you've provided. Ergo, we see that the evidence for different levels of g at different altitudes is non-existent. A myth like so many other myths.

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #37 on: August 01, 2007, 04:31:03 PM »
Quote
Follow the links, pal. There's more than enough USGS data on gravity measurements. And we've already had this discussion and you left the thread in your usual cowardly manner.

There are no links in the PDF you've provided. Ergo, we see that the evidence for different levels of g at different altitudes is non-existent. A myth like so many other myths.
You're an idiot. Even if I'm 100% wrong, you still can't justify that conclusion.

From the article:
Information on gravity base stations and availability
of gravity maps and data in specific areas
can be obtained from:
Pat Hill
U.S. Geological Survey
Box 25046, MS 964
Denver Federal Center
Denver, CO 80225
(303) 236-1343
pathill@musette.cr.usgs.gov
Viki Bankey (same address)
(303) 236-1348
viki@musette.cr.usgs.gov
Vicki Langenheim
U.S. Geological Survey
345 Middlefield Road, MS 939
Menlo Park, CA 94025
(415) 329-5313
zulanger@mojave.wr.usgs.gov
web site: http://minerals.er.usgs.gov

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Roundy the Truthinessist

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #38 on: August 01, 2007, 04:40:06 PM »
See, there was a link there.  To the USGS government website.  ::)
Where did you educate the biology, in toulet?

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sokarul

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #39 on: August 01, 2007, 04:48:01 PM »
There is other ways then to use a $200,000 clock.  Ok so you say your experiment worked.  Post up the lab report so it can be reviewed. 
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

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James

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #40 on: August 01, 2007, 06:11:09 PM »
So this is from a government source?  ::)

Didn't want to be accused of crying Conspiracy here, but you partly read my mind.
"For your own sake, as well as for that of our beloved country, be bold and firm against error and evil of every kind." - David Wardlaw Scott, Terra Firma 1901

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sokarul

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #41 on: August 01, 2007, 06:12:51 PM »
There is other ways then to use a $200,000 clock.  Ok so you say your experiment worked.  Post up the lab report so it can be reviewed. 
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

*

Roundy the Truthinessist

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #42 on: August 01, 2007, 06:14:38 PM »
So this is from a government source?  ::)

Didn't want to be accused of crying Conspiracy here, but you partly read my mind.

Hey, it's built into the theory that you don't trust the government.  Therefore, I see nothing wrong with crying Conspiracy when evidence such as this is presented.
Where did you educate the biology, in toulet?

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James

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #43 on: August 01, 2007, 06:55:43 PM »
Hey, it's built into the theory that you don't trust the government.  Therefore, I see nothing wrong with crying Conspiracy when evidence such as this is presented.

You're right I suppose, but people often whine whenever I bring up the Conspiracy, so I do it as little as possible these days.

Conspiracy or no Conspiracy, the problem with Sok's "evidence" goes deeper, into the issue I brought up in the "Evidence/belief" thread over in Philosophy. Whoever it is, we'd still just be taking their word for it.
"For your own sake, as well as for that of our beloved country, be bold and firm against error and evil of every kind." - David Wardlaw Scott, Terra Firma 1901

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sokarul

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #44 on: August 01, 2007, 06:57:48 PM »
There is other ways then to use a $200,000 clock.  Ok so you say your experiment worked.  Post up the lab report so it can be reviewed. 
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #45 on: August 02, 2007, 03:30:02 AM »
Quote
Follow the links, pal. There's more than enough USGS data on gravity measurements. And we've already had this discussion and you left the thread in your usual cowardly manner.

There are no links in the PDF you've provided. Ergo, we see that the evidence for different levels of g at different altitudes is non-existent. A myth like so many other myths.

Please take a course in logic.

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #46 on: August 02, 2007, 05:26:07 AM »
oi this thread has been busy,  well there was recently a satellite (or weather balloon for you FE er's) that map the changes in gravity across the entire globe.  I'll try and find the article on it later.

again distance does play an effect on gravitational pull between two objects, for instance jupiter does not accelerate towards us at 9.81 m/s^2 even though it is still attracted by the Earth's gravitational pull.  Like mentioned before with the sheet analogy space flattens out the further you get away from the bowling ball.

and as for the idea of space bend, space-time does bend.  The Earth's rotation causes twists in space-time due to the earth's mass, there have been experiments to prove that.

Someone also said that there maybe other forces bending light.  This is a possibility but those theories have yet to be fully tested so I cannot say whether or not those are true, but there's an incredible amount of data supporting Einstein's theory. 

Another known effect is the Gravitational Faraday Effect which is incredible small but is still there.   
"avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you.."

?

trig

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #47 on: August 02, 2007, 06:09:51 AM »
So this is from a government source?  ::)

Didn't want to be accused of crying Conspiracy here, but you partly read my mind.

Hey, it's built into the theory that you don't trust the government.  Therefore, I see nothing wrong with crying Conspiracy when evidence such as this is presented.
You have to cry "Conspiracy" every time an expensive test is mentioned because you need a smoke screen hiding the very simple, relatively inexpensive tests proposed elsewhere. It is convenient for you to divert attention to trips to the Ice Wall, plane trips from Argentina to Australia and so on because otherwise you have to argue your findings yourself.

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #48 on: August 02, 2007, 06:55:28 AM »
oi this thread has been busy,  well there was recently a satellite (or weather balloon for you FE er's) that map the changes in gravity across the entire globe.  I'll try and find the article on it later.

again distance does play an effect on gravitational pull between two objects, for instance jupiter does not accelerate towards us at 9.81 m/s^2 even though it is still attracted by the Earth's gravitational pull.  Like mentioned before with the sheet analogy space flattens out the further you get away from the bowling ball.

and as for the idea of space bend, space-time does bend.  The Earth's rotation causes twists in space-time due to the earth's mass, there have been experiments to prove that.

Someone also said that there maybe other forces bending light.  This is a possibility but those theories have yet to be fully tested so I cannot say whether or not those are true, but there's an incredible amount of data supporting Einstein's theory. 

Another known effect is the Gravitational Faraday Effect which is incredible small but is still there.   

I'm pretty sure the FE'ers don't think Jupiter is a big gas giant... I think it's really small, so a lot of things would be different.

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #49 on: August 02, 2007, 11:00:42 AM »
oi this thread has been busy,  well there was recently a satellite (or weather balloon for you FE er's) that map the changes in gravity across the entire globe.  I'll try and find the article on it later.

again distance does play an effect on gravitational pull between two objects, for instance jupiter does not accelerate towards us at 9.81 m/s^2 even though it is still attracted by the Earth's gravitational pull.  Like mentioned before with the sheet analogy space flattens out the further you get away from the bowling ball.

and as for the idea of space bend, space-time does bend.  The Earth's rotation causes twists in space-time due to the earth's mass, there have been experiments to prove that.

Someone also said that there maybe other forces bending light.  This is a possibility but those theories have yet to be fully tested so I cannot say whether or not those are true, but there's an incredible amount of data supporting Einstein's theory. 

Another known effect is the Gravitational Faraday Effect which is incredible small but is still there.   

I'm pretty sure the FE'ers don't think Jupiter is a big gas giant... I think it's really small, so a lot of things would be different.


so Jupiter doesn't accelerate towards us cause it's really small then?  that's just ludicrous, Jupiter is massive!  I'm not even going to argue that one, do FE'ers suppose the sun is small too?
"avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you.."

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TheEngineer

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #50 on: August 02, 2007, 11:40:38 AM »
Did you even read the FAQ?


"I haven't been wrong since 1961, when I thought I made a mistake."
        -- Bob Hudson

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #51 on: August 02, 2007, 11:50:28 AM »
oi this thread has been busy,  well there was recently a satellite (or weather balloon for you FE er's) that map the changes in gravity across the entire globe.  I'll try and find the article on it later.

again distance does play an effect on gravitational pull between two objects, for instance jupiter does not accelerate towards us at 9.81 m/s^2 even though it is still attracted by the Earth's gravitational pull.  Like mentioned before with the sheet analogy space flattens out the further you get away from the bowling ball.

and as for the idea of space bend, space-time does bend.  The Earth's rotation causes twists in space-time due to the earth's mass, there have been experiments to prove that.

Someone also said that there maybe other forces bending light.  This is a possibility but those theories have yet to be fully tested so I cannot say whether or not those are true, but there's an incredible amount of data supporting Einstein's theory. 

Another known effect is the Gravitational Faraday Effect which is incredible small but is still there.   

I'm pretty sure the FE'ers don't think Jupiter is a big gas giant... I think it's really small, so a lot of things would be different.


so Jupiter doesn't accelerate towards us cause it's really small then?  that's just ludicrous, Jupiter is massive!  I'm not even going to argue that one, do FE'ers suppose the sun is small too?

Yes, and it's only 3000 miles overhead. And it's a spotlight. And it can sustain it's height (even though nothing else can, other than the moon, and stars, and ...)

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #52 on: August 02, 2007, 11:52:27 AM »
Did you even read the FAQ?

yes, only yesterday so pardon if I'm not fully aware of all the answers provided by theory.  So you say the Earth is not a moon, or star (in this case Jupiter) so it doesn't produce a gravitational field?

but being a star or moon is not a defining criteria of the existence gravity, mass is.  Mass is a property of the moon, star and earth. 



 
"avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you.."

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #53 on: August 02, 2007, 11:54:42 AM »
oi this thread has been busy,  well there was recently a satellite (or weather balloon for you FE er's) that map the changes in gravity across the entire globe.  I'll try and find the article on it later.

again distance does play an effect on gravitational pull between two objects, for instance jupiter does not accelerate towards us at 9.81 m/s^2 even though it is still attracted by the Earth's gravitational pull.  Like mentioned before with the sheet analogy space flattens out the further you get away from the bowling ball.

and as for the idea of space bend, space-time does bend.  The Earth's rotation causes twists in space-time due to the earth's mass, there have been experiments to prove that.

Someone also said that there maybe other forces bending light.  This is a possibility but those theories have yet to be fully tested so I cannot say whether or not those are true, but there's an incredible amount of data supporting Einstein's theory. 

Another known effect is the Gravitational Faraday Effect which is incredible small but is still there.   

I'm pretty sure the FE'ers don't think Jupiter is a big gas giant... I think it's really small, so a lot of things would be different.


so Jupiter doesn't accelerate towards us cause it's really small then?  that's just ludicrous, Jupiter is massive!  I'm not even going to argue that one, do FE'ers suppose the sun is small too?

Yes, and it's only 3000 miles overhead. And it's a spotlight. And it can sustain it's height (even though nothing else can, other than the moon, and stars, and ...)

then why does it take light around 8 minutes to travel 3000 miles?
"avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you.."

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TheEngineer

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #54 on: August 02, 2007, 11:58:23 AM »
It doesn't.


"I haven't been wrong since 1961, when I thought I made a mistake."
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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #55 on: August 02, 2007, 12:00:18 PM »
and it still travels 2.91x10^8 m/s?
"avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you.."

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TheEngineer

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #56 on: August 02, 2007, 12:07:21 PM »
About 299,792,458 m/s, yes.


"I haven't been wrong since 1961, when I thought I made a mistake."
        -- Bob Hudson

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #57 on: August 02, 2007, 12:13:30 PM »
if you guys want to really test for varying g then just get a very accurate small scale (not terribly expensive and commercially available) and a 1kg mass and weigh it at sea level then take it to the top of a mountain say the sierra's (tom I am looking at you) and re-weigh it now the difernece will not be much different but it will be different. now the difference is small mainly due to the fact of the size of the earth compared to only climbing 10,000ft or so of going up the mountain.
Only 2 things are infinite the universe and human stupidity, but I am not sure about the former.

Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #58 on: August 02, 2007, 12:24:41 PM »
About 299,792,458 m/s, yes.

so the sun is 3000 miles from Earth and much smaller then I'd imagine
"avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mindboggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you.."

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CommonCents

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Re: Sketipical Physics
« Reply #59 on: August 02, 2007, 12:28:38 PM »
About 299,792,458 m/s, yes.

so the sun is 3000 miles from Earth and much smaller then I'd imagine

I think it's 3000 miles away and 35 miles in diameter.
OMG!