Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test

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Cinlef

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Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #60 on: March 25, 2006, 11:40:17 AM »
Also it is the opinionof some scholars I have read that early mariners in pre Classical Greek times also believed the Earth to be round, deducing this from the whole ships on the horizon thing. Howeever that is speculation since befrore the Greek philosophical tradition of enquery few people felt the need to share and record scientific knowledge in the way we do today.
Also Dnate the great medival Italian poet describes a spherical Earth in his Divine Commedia (granted he assumed the Western Hemisphere to be ocean) indicating even in Medival times people believed the Earth to be round
An enraged
Cinlef
Truth is great and will prevail-Thomas Jefferson

I've said it before and I'll say it again, Cinlef is the bestest!

Melior est sapientia quam vires-Wisdom

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Erasmus

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Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #61 on: March 25, 2006, 12:15:16 PM »
Quote from: "Cinlef"
(granted he assumed the Western Hemisphere to be ocean)


That, in fact, was one of the major geographic misconceptions of the age, along with an incorrect figure for the Earth's circumference (which is telling in and of itself).  It's also what Columbus assumed when he tried to find a westward passage to Asia.

Quote
An enraged
Cinlef


You've been enraged a lot lately, Cinlef.  Is everything okay?

-Erasmus
Why did the chicken cross the Möbius strip?

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Cinlef

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Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #62 on: March 25, 2006, 12:44:53 PM »
lol just my default  state is  anger at things.
An amused
Cinlef
Truth is great and will prevail-Thomas Jefferson

I've said it before and I'll say it again, Cinlef is the bestest!

Melior est sapientia quam vires-Wisdom

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #63 on: March 30, 2006, 02:56:35 PM »
Quote
If the world is round wouldn't we fall off? Wouldn't the people in Australia fall into "space"?


Idiot.

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #64 on: March 31, 2006, 07:15:00 AM »
Quote from: "Erasmus"
Quote from: "The_vilest_worm"
Things that are far enough away from the earth are not affected by the earth's gravity. This is why the moon doesn't crash into us.


This is pretty much... wrong.  The moon doesn't crash into us because it's moving.  The Earth's gravity *does* effect the moon, quite significantly in fact -- it keeps it from flying off into space.  Like the way the sun's gravity keeps the Earth from flying off into space.

yes its called a geosincrinos orbit (sorry for the spelling i had a dyslexic moment) the orbit is degrading constantly but the speed it is traveling keeps it from slamming ino the earth, this is why we dont slam into the sun.
-grim

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Erasmus

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Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #65 on: March 31, 2006, 10:57:21 AM »
Quote from: "the grim squeaker"
yes its called a geosincrinos orbit (sorry for the spelling i had a dyslexic moment) the orbit is degrading constantly but the speed it is traveling keeps it from slamming ino the earth, this is why we dont slam into the sun.
-grim


The moon is not in a geosynchronous orbit; its orbital period is about 28 siderial days (as opposed to 1, which is the definition of a geosynchronous orbit.)

-Erasmus
Why did the chicken cross the Möbius strip?

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #66 on: March 31, 2006, 11:55:56 AM »
Quote from: "Erasmus"
Quote from: "the grim squeaker"
yes its called a geosincrinos orbit (sorry for the spelling i had a dyslexic moment) the orbit is degrading constantly but the speed it is traveling keeps it from slamming ino the earth, this is why we dont slam into the sun.
-grim


The moon is not in a geosynchronous orbit; its orbital period is about 28 siderial days (as opposed to 1, which is the definition of a geosynchronous orbit.)

-Erasmus

isnt that geostationary?
-a confuzzled grim

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Cinlef

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Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #67 on: March 31, 2006, 05:43:55 PM »
Err isn't geostationary orbit a contratiction in terms?
A puzzled
Cinlef
Truth is great and will prevail-Thomas Jefferson

I've said it before and I'll say it again, Cinlef is the bestest!

Melior est sapientia quam vires-Wisdom

?

EnragedPenguin

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« Reply #68 on: March 31, 2006, 06:21:11 PM »
Quote from: "Cinlef"
Err isn't geostationary orbit a contratiction in terms?
A puzzled
Cinlef


Not really, note the "geo" part, it just means a satellite that is in orbit over the equator and orbiting at the same speed that the earth turns, which keeps it over the same spot, or "geographic location". To an observer standing on the earth it would appear to be stationary in the sky.

At least, I'm pretty sure that's what it is.
A different world cannot be built by indifferent people.

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #69 on: March 31, 2006, 06:22:15 PM »
GEOSTATIONARY: Of, relating to or being a satellite that travels above Earth's equator from west to east at an altitude of approximately 35,900 kilometers (22,300 miles) and at a speed matching that of Earth's rotation, thus remaining stationary in relation to Earth.

GEOSYNCHRONOUS:  of or having an orbit with a fixed period of 24 hours (although the position in the orbit may not be fixed with respect to the earth)

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Erasmus

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Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #70 on: March 31, 2006, 06:49:43 PM »
Quote from: "the grim squeaker"
The moon is not in a geosynchronous orbit; its orbital period is about 28 siderial days (as opposed to 1, which is the definition of a geosynchronous orbit.)

isnt that geostationary?
-a confuzzled grim[/quote]

No.

Quote from: "EnragedPenguin"
Quote from: "Cinlef"
Err isn't geostationary orbit a contratiction in terms?


Not really, note the "geo" part, it just means a satellite that is in orbit over the equator and orbiting at the same speed that the earth turns, which keeps it over the same spot, or "geographic location". To an observer standing on the earth it would appear to be stationary in the sky.


That is what it is.

To expand on Bongo's definitions, a geostationary orbit is a special kind of geosynchronous orbit.  A geosynchronous orbit has a period of one siderial day (the time it takes the "fixed" stars to make one full trip around the sky; also, the true rotationary period of the Earth).  However, its orbital plane might be inclined to the Earth's equatorial plane, and so it wouldn't stay in the same position in the sky (most notably, it might move north and south).

A geostationary orbit, aside from having a period of one siderial day, orbits in the same plane as the Earth rotates -- the equatorial plane.  So if you put a pole in the ground pointing up at the satellite, the pole's top end and the satellite are following essentially the same orbit (just at different heights).  The pole will always point at the satellite, whereas in the geosynchronous case, the pole would point at the satellite only once every siderial day (but always at the same time).

-Erasmus
Why did the chicken cross the Möbius strip?

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #71 on: April 06, 2006, 06:24:20 PM »
Quote from: "I are a believer"


hence particles of dust stick to big spherical things, [I guess? haha]
Sorry but I'm quite tired and my commen sense is low.

Actually, I think it's electromagnetism that causes that.
The Earth rests on an Infinite stack of Turtles...
Stop raping the llamas!
I'm a platypus gynecologist, damn it!
"I once taught a rabbit to fly with only a string..." -Now

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #72 on: August 20, 2006, 07:38:32 AM »
Quote from: "Pesto"
Quote from: "Paranoid_Android"
People believe things if they have no way to disprove them - in the Middle Ages, nobody had a means to prove that gravity existed or that the Earth was round.  We do now.  We have that technology in our hands.

Actually, they did have the technology, but no one had thought of the proper experiments.  The technology needed to prove the Earth is round and gravity exists is quite simple.  Some of the math involved can be a bit complex, and the astrological observations that put the first cracks in the geocentric universe take some more specialized equipment, but the actual proof uses very simple equipment.

All you need is some string, some weights and some patience.
have you heard of Eratosthenes?

he used the angle of the sun to measure the Earth's circumference. he did it very accurately too.
http://www.k12science.org/noonday/option3a.2.html
Quote from: "HiveLord"
Quote from: "Tim the Enchanter"
the highest point on earth is only 7 miles above sea level, and the lowest point 8 miles below it


Really?
The lowest point on the earth is 8 miles below sea level?

Then, by your 'round earth' model, most of the world doesn't exist- only the north pole (the north pole being the highest point of the sea) and 8 miles below it exist. Which would mean there is only a small segment of a sphere. Not a whole sphere.

Unless, of course, you are suggesting that the 'round earth' has a diameter of only 8 miles?

I don't think anyone is going to believe you on that point.
that argument doesn't make sense.
the radius of the (spherical) Earth is about 6400 km. more than enough headroom to account for the point 8 miles below sea level.
he computer genius guy

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Wombo

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #73 on: August 20, 2006, 10:47:32 AM »
if you get a ball as big as the earth and the australian/water falls off, maybe I'll reconsider.

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #74 on: August 20, 2006, 09:38:42 PM »
Quote
Really?
The lowest point on the earth is 8 miles below sea level?

Then, by your 'round earth' model, most of the world doesn't exist- only the north pole (the north pole being the highest point of the sea) and 8 miles below it exist. Which would mean there is only a small segment of a sphere. Not a whole sphere.

Unless, of course, you are suggesting that the 'round earth' has a diameter of only 8 miles?

I don't think anyone is going to believe you on that point.

He meant the lowest point of the earth that can be reached without mining. Idiot.

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #75 on: August 22, 2006, 12:18:45 PM »
Quote from: "Erasmus"

That is what it is.

To expand on Bongo's definitions, a geostationary orbit is a special kind of geosynchronous orbit.  A geosynchronous orbit has a period of one siderial day (the time it takes the "fixed" stars to make one full trip around the sky; also, the true rotationary period of the Earth).  However, its orbital plane might be inclined to the Earth's equatorial plane, and so it wouldn't stay in the same position in the sky (most notably, it might move north and south).

A geostationary orbit, aside from having a period of one siderial day, orbits in the same plane as the Earth rotates -- the equatorial plane.  So if you put a pole in the ground pointing up at the satellite, the pole's top end and the satellite are following essentially the same orbit (just at different heights).  The pole will always point at the satellite, whereas in the geosynchronous case, the pole would point at the satellite only once every siderial day (but always at the same time).

-Erasmus

ye know too much! Conspiracy!
tf?

Something that no Round Earther can answer. Proof & Test
« Reply #76 on: August 22, 2006, 02:56:11 PM »
Quote
Erasmus wrote:

That is what it is.

To expand on Bongo's definitions, a geostationary orbit is a special kind of geosynchronous orbit. A geosynchronous orbit has a period of one siderial day (the time it takes the "fixed" stars to make one full trip around the sky; also, the true rotationary period of the Earth). However, its orbital plane might be inclined to the Earth's equatorial plane, and so it wouldn't stay in the same position in the sky (most notably, it might move north and south).

A geostationary orbit, aside from having a period of one siderial day, orbits in the same plane as the Earth rotates -- the equatorial plane. So if you put a pole in the ground pointing up at the satellite, the pole's top end and the satellite are following essentially the same orbit (just at different heights). The pole will always point at the satellite, whereas in the geosynchronous case, the pole would point at the satellite only once every siderial day (but always at the same time).

-Erasmus

ye know too much! Conspiracy!

OMG. Grab the pitchforks and torches..
no..
wait.
thats for monsters.
sry.
quote="DiegoDraw"]"And Moses said unto his brethren: 'The Earth is flat!...biznatches,'" [/quote]
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