The liquid earth

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The liquid earth
« on: April 11, 2007, 12:51:14 PM »
You acknoledge the existence of valcanoes, you say the earth is thick enough for a liquid core.

If the centre of the earth is liquid, then the accelerating force (apparently infinite) propelling us upwards must surely cause the earth to spread outwards, imagine a ball of dough being squashed, so that the earth must become continually wider and thinner.

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narcberry

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2007, 12:55:35 PM »
The force has a seemingly infinate supply of energy (curse the day we find out otherwise), but not an infinite force. However, the earth is made of very strong materials that hold their shape quite nicely. It's not like a ball of dough, but rather a rock propelled through space.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2007, 01:05:10 PM »
The force accelerating the earth upwards would presumably cause this effect, where it not for the ice barrier encircling us, it acts to cool the molten rock at its edges and contain it within the circumferance.

The continual force does off course have profound effect on the make up of the planet, and the high pressure causes the heat that melts the rock, and causes the occasional eruptions of molten rock from within, thus volcanoes; your original point.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2007, 01:07:44 PM »
yes, however all rock in inherently viscous, hence the continual moovement of mountain ranges. and surely at an infinate speed it could be comparably like dough.
Or, on the other side, the infinate speed and acceleration would cause INFINITE forces on the materials of the earth.  This would destroy the earth.

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narcberry

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2007, 01:16:41 PM »
The speed is not infinite, neither is the acceleration. The acceleration is 9.8 m/s/s. The speed is somewhere below the speed of light, but it is impossible to determine the exact speed.

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Midnight

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2007, 01:17:01 PM »
The force has a seemingly infinate supply of energy (curse the day we find out otherwise), but not an infinite force. However, the earth is made of very strong materials that hold their shape quite nicely. It's not like a ball of dough, but rather a rock propelled through space.

There is no known substance to mankind that could withstand such forces.
My problem with his ideas is that it is a ridiculous thing.

Genius. PURE, undiluted genius.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2007, 01:19:39 PM »
infinate energy, "burned" at a constant rate, would cause a constant force and constant acceleration, not infinate, constant. I think my previous statement quashes your dough model, and incorporates the viscousity of rock as a factor, if you like I could explain it some more?

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narcberry

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2007, 01:24:10 PM »
The force has a seemingly infinate supply of energy (curse the day we find out otherwise), but not an infinite force. However, the earth is made of very strong materials that hold their shape quite nicely. It's not like a ball of dough, but rather a rock propelled through space.

There is no known substance to mankind that could withstand such forces.

9.8 m/s/s? Then you have a problem with a flat and a round earth.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2007, 01:26:58 PM »
The force has a seemingly infinate supply of energy (curse the day we find out otherwise), but not an infinite force. However, the earth is made of very strong materials that hold their shape quite nicely. It's not like a ball of dough, but rather a rock propelled through space.

There is no known substance to mankind that could withstand such forces.

True, but the viscousity of the rock absorbs the force to avoid destruction.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2007, 01:29:23 PM »
the earth must be going faster than the speed of light if the basic equation of acceleration is correct.
it says the the earth would have reached the speed of light in 354 and a bit days! if we are not going this speed yet, the earth is less than 1 year old.  Is it??
someone is wrong somewhere and i don't think it was prof. newton

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2007, 01:35:39 PM »
infinate supply of energy, this sounds like nuclear fusion. 
the answer to the energy problem might be closer than we think.
but then where is the heat? 
i'm not sure what cold fusion is but that might have somthing to do with it

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narcberry

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2007, 01:41:13 PM »
The only problem with passing the speed of light is explained in the theory of relativity. This theory also explains why this is not a problem.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2007, 01:44:08 PM »
ahh yes, that rule. 
this also means that an infinite force IS needed.
faster than the speed of light = infinate Mass
infinate mass= infinate force

i was right eddy.

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narcberry

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #13 on: April 11, 2007, 01:46:11 PM »
But we are traveling sub-c. No infinite force is needed. Our mass would increase, but not from our own perspective, so we don't know.

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sokarul

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2007, 01:47:18 PM »
The force has a seemingly infinate supply of energy (curse the day we find out otherwise), but not an infinite force. However, the earth is made of very strong materials that hold their shape quite nicely. It's not like a ball of dough, but rather a rock propelled through space.
Not according to tom.  you may want to talk to other fe'ers first. 

A infinite acceleration needs an infinite force. 
Sokarul

ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

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Midnight

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2007, 01:47:37 PM »
The force has a seemingly infinate supply of energy (curse the day we find out otherwise), but not an infinite force. However, the earth is made of very strong materials that hold their shape quite nicely. It's not like a ball of dough, but rather a rock propelled through space.

There is no known substance to mankind that could withstand such forces.

True, but the viscousity of the rock absorbs the force to avoid destruction.

I see your point, but again, it has to have a saturation point, after which, the laws of physics will bisect.
My problem with his ideas is that it is a ridiculous thing.

Genius. PURE, undiluted genius.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #16 on: April 11, 2007, 01:47:53 PM »
sorry, you'll need to explain that one to me.

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narcberry

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2007, 01:49:20 PM »
The force has a seemingly infinate supply of energy (curse the day we find out otherwise), but not an infinite force. However, the earth is made of very strong materials that hold their shape quite nicely. It's not like a ball of dough, but rather a rock propelled through space.
Not according to tom.  you may want to talk to other fe'ers first. 

A infinite acceleration needs an infinite force. 

I agree, an infinite acceleration requires an infinite force.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2007, 01:51:59 PM »
yes although i was wrong with the infinite acceleration, however an infinite force regardless

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2007, 01:54:07 PM »
by the way narcberry, is that you in the picture or not.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2007, 01:55:11 PM »
Lets not get hung up on the speed of light.

Young Einstein was unlucky enough to have been around at a time when flat earth theory was yet to be fully completed; but to use his thinkings to show how an object may accelerate forever:

While working on his theory of relativity, Einstein conducted mind experiments, imagine driving at 60 miles an hour beside a train which is also travelling at 60 miles an hour in the same direction, the train would appear stationary. Now imagine catching a light beam and riding it along in the same direction as another light beam, that light beam would appear stationary too. The objective speed of anything is relative to your perspective on it so that speed of light on earth need only stay 300 000 000ms beyond the speed of the earth and we would never reach it.

In short, the speed of light is also accelerating at a constant speed of 9.8mss.

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narcberry

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2007, 02:00:33 PM »
Off Topic
I had one of these thought experiments regarding moving gasses. We are taught that a moving gas experiences less pressure than that of a gas at rest.

Traveling down the highway, you roll down your window. Which side of the window has the lower pressure? I've been thinking about this for days, and I would love a simple answer.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #22 on: April 11, 2007, 02:01:59 PM »
so are you "postulating" that the speed of light is accelerating

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #23 on: April 11, 2007, 02:06:15 PM »
Theoreticaly yes. The speed of light on earth must be at a constant magnitude beyond that of earth, and we know that earth is accelerating continualy upwards, therefore...

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2007, 02:06:51 PM »
well a presure difference causes a buoyency under water so i assume it causes a gradient of force out of water aswell.
therefore would it not be possible to see if there was a noticable force on small objects.

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Midnight

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2007, 02:08:10 PM »
by the way narcberry, is that you in the picture or not.

It's Steve Martin, an American Comedian,Novelist. Quite a funny chap too.
My problem with his ideas is that it is a ridiculous thing.

Genius. PURE, undiluted genius.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #26 on: April 11, 2007, 02:10:00 PM »
The wind coming through the car window would have too great an affect on any small object, I can't see how we could measure the presures in that way.

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narcberry

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #27 on: April 11, 2007, 02:11:09 PM »
by the way narcberry, is that you in the picture or not.

It's Steve Martin, an American Comedian,Novelist. Quite a funny chap too.

It appears so, but no.

Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #28 on: April 11, 2007, 02:13:06 PM »
ok, lets see another photo. not that i could tell the difference

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∂G/∂x

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Re: The liquid earth
« Reply #29 on: April 11, 2007, 02:14:57 PM »
In a car the air pressure is greatest on the inside.
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