Gravity, or lack thereof

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CommonCents

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Gravity, or lack thereof
« on: March 27, 2007, 08:03:30 AM »
Hi, I've been reading these forums for about a week now but today's the first time I really feel like posting something.  In the FE theory there's no gravity holding us or anything to the 'disc' right?  Instead this disc is being propelled 'upwards' at around 9.8 m/s^2 right?  I have seen it said that the Sun, Moon, Stars, and everything else are propelled by this same force so they move with us and maintain relative distances.  Now here's my question...
If everything in the FE universe is propelled by some force which keeps it accelerating at 9.8 m/s^2 then why doesn't this force effect us?  For example I saw it posted earlier that if you were to go beyond the 'Ice Wall' you would stop accelerating because Earth's not pushing you anymore, but why does the force that pushes Earth not also accelerate that person? If this force does effect this person then doesn't it mean that if I were to jump up right now the force would keep me accelerating relative to the earth, sky, moon, sun, stars and make it appear as if there is NO 'gravity'?
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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2007, 08:17:24 AM »
Hi, I've been reading these forums for about a week now but today's the first time I really feel like posting something.  In the FE theory there's no gravity holding us or anything to the 'disc' right?  Instead this disc is being propelled 'upwards' at around 9.8 m/s^2 right?  I have seen it said that the Sun, Moon, Stars, and everything else are propelled by this same force so they move with us and maintain relative distances.  Now here's my question...
If everything in the FE universe is propelled by some force which keeps it accelerating at 9.8 m/s^2 then why doesn't this force effect us?  For example I saw it posted earlier that if you were to go beyond the 'Ice Wall' you would stop accelerating because Earth's not pushing you anymore, but why does the force that pushes Earth not also accelerate that person? If this force does effect this person then doesn't it mean that if I were to jump up right now the force would keep me accelerating relative to the earth, sky, moon, sun, stars and make it appear as if there is NO 'gravity'?

Maybe it's because we're made of different things than the sun/moon/earth?   Possibly a barrier around the flat earth that stops us from being effected by it? Other than that, I really don't know why it wouldn't effect us...

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CommonCents

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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2007, 10:03:44 AM »
What 'barrier' is this, and as I said it's been stated that if you were to go beyond the 'Ice Wall' you would stop accelerating and see the earth accelerate away...where's the 'barrier' then?  Or is it a magical force field that we generate? If this is the case how is it generated?  Can it be measured?  Come on guys I've only been here a week :P
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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2007, 11:56:41 AM »
You're missing the point. Engineer is cleverly pointing out that there is absolutely no way to differentiate between the force of gravity and acceleration acting on your body. Therefore, if the earth was actually accelerating endlessly through the universe, we would feel it in the same way that gravity affects us.

A good example is in 2001: a Space Odyssey. They have a spacehip with a carousel section which keeps people inertially pinned to the underside of the ring. It's a different application, but the principle behind that and constant acceleration is the same.
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CommonCents

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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2007, 12:14:21 PM »
Ramen you miss my point.  I'm saying that there is SOMETHING pushing this flat earth, and also that same SOMETHING is pushing the stars and the sun and the moon and other celestial bodies.  Why then does that SOMETHING not have any effect on me?   I'm aware of the similarity of gravity, acceleration, and inertial force....but these forces effect me while the magic force that moves the earth does not.
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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2007, 12:24:16 PM »
i find when things like this are bought up the FEer normally say 'the physics of it is not understood'!

Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2007, 12:27:04 PM »
Uhh, if they didn't affect you then you'd float off into space.

The fact that you're still pinned to the Earth means that they affect you in the same way.
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CommonCents

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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2007, 12:41:52 PM »
Correction...the EARTH pushing me as a result of this force is proof that this force is NOT effecting me....do you see where I'm going with this or do I have to break it down more?   The Illusion of 'gravity' is from matter's resistance to motion correct? INERTIA I believe you mentioned this yourself....when the ground which is being pushed upwards by some unknown force pushes me INERTIA makes me want to stay where I was creating the illusion of gravity.  So why won't this force that pushes the ground affect me....keep in mind a body at rest tends to stay at rest UNLESS ACTED ON BY AN OUTSIDE FORCE...
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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2007, 12:43:07 PM »
and on the 8th day, God created Caturday
postahol (n) - poh-st-ah-hall. --- a unknown a addiction to posting randomly and meaninglessly with the intention to annoy.

Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2007, 12:49:59 PM »
The outside force IS the ground. When you're standing still on the ground, the force causing the earth to push up at you is resisted equally by the normal force. If you jump, then the normal force exceeds the gravitational force, and when you fall, the normal force is being exceeded by the gravitational force. Round-earth physics requires you to reverse the vectors, but the physics is still the same.
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CommonCents

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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2007, 12:52:14 PM »
I'm afraid I don't understand what you're saying :(   

1.) My understanding of FE was that the Earth is moving upwards is this correct?

2.) Something must be driving the Earth is this correct?

3.) This something should affect me is this correct?


Please I'm a moron try to answer in order, numbers would be welcome.
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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2007, 01:01:49 PM »
You're correct, according to what people call FE facts, the earth is constantly accelerating upward. They don't elaborate on this force at all, however, and thus it is improper to assume that said force would exert any effect on us at all. For all we know, it's a gigantic rocket ship under the flat earth, in which case then no, the force exerted by the motor would not directly affect those on top.
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CommonCents

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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2007, 01:04:51 PM »
So then the line of thinking is correct it's just the lack of proof of a 'source' is not?   Glad to hear my brain works, I'll look for where I heard about a 'source' of this acceleration.
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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2007, 01:22:39 PM »
Yeah, look up on that. I haven't heard anybody elaborate on what makes the earth do what it does, other than "it just does." I'd be interested to know what makes the earth do that, but it may be just as futile a question as "why does the sun do what it does?"
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Tom Bishop

Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2007, 01:25:23 PM »
The source of the acceleration is known to stem from the expansion of the universe. If we look up into the night skies we can see the universe slowly moving away from itself. The underlying mechanism for the expanding universe is unknown, but Round Earth theorists invoke something called "dark energy" to describe this phenomenon.

The truth is the mechanism for the accelerating universe is just as mysterious in RE as it is in FE.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accelerating_universe

It is my opinion that the Big Bang is, quite simply, still happening to this very day.

« Last Edit: March 27, 2007, 01:29:11 PM by Tom Bishop »

Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2007, 01:30:46 PM »
That would make sense, as it has been detected that the universe not only is expanding, but accelerating in its expansion. Whether or not it's a linear acceleration I don't know, but it could be one logical explanation for the flat Earth rocketing through the cosmos.

One thing that confuses me, though, is the path that the flat earth takes through the universe. Since we have mapped all six degrees of the sky around us (at least partially) that would imply that man has seen what could only be seen from the "bottom" of the flat earth. Does this mean that the earth rotates on an axis, like a pancake being tossed from a frying pan? If so, what would this mean for the direction the Earth zips through the universe? Does it always propel our side "forward", or does it follow one linear path, with the Earth rotating along it?
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CommonCents

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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2007, 01:32:07 PM »
Ok a universal expansion...wouldn't that effect me just as much as it effects the Earth? So doesn't this make my question valid again?  Anyway thanks, Tom, for that link, even if it doesn't answer my first question it at least answers another.
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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2007, 03:40:36 PM »
The source of the acceleration is known to stem from the expansion of the universe. If we look up into the night skies we can see the universe slowly moving away from itself. The underlying mechanism for the expanding universe is unknown, but Round Earth theorists invoke something called "dark energy" to describe this phenomenon.

The truth is the mechanism for the accelerating universe is just as mysterious in RE as it is in FE.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accelerating_universe

It is my opinion that the Big Bang is, quite simply, still happening to this very day.


Actually Tom, if the acceleration of the earth is caused solely by the expanding universe, I'm not sure if we would actually be experiencing the acceleration like if it was from an external source. Maybe the Engineer can jump in here and clarify this, but it is my understanding that not all of the expansion is from objects moving through space, but it is spacetime itself that is expanding, making the universe larger. If that is the case, and we are on an earth accelerating WITH spacetime, I'm not sure it would be like normal acceleration.   
The Engineer, can you step in here please?

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TheEngineer

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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2007, 01:36:32 PM »
Actually Tom, if the acceleration of the earth is caused solely by the expanding universe, I'm not sure if we would actually be experiencing the acceleration like if it was from an external source. Maybe the Engineer can jump in here and clarify this, but it is my understanding that not all of the expansion is from objects moving through space, but it is spacetime itself that is expanding, making the universe larger. If that is the case, and we are on an earth accelerating WITH spacetime, I'm not sure it would be like normal acceleration.   
The Engineer, can you step in here please?
Yes, the expanding universe is not causing objects to undergo acceleration.  It is merely the metric of space that is expanding.  The space is growing between objects without the objects themselves moving.  This means that two objects can have an apparent velocity greater than the speed of light, as it's nothing but the space between them is growing.


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Re: Gravity, or lack thereof
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2007, 06:13:55 PM »
Actually Tom, if the acceleration of the earth is caused solely by the expanding universe, I'm not sure if we would actually be experiencing the acceleration like if it was from an external source. Maybe the Engineer can jump in here and clarify this, but it is my understanding that not all of the expansion is from objects moving through space, but it is spacetime itself that is expanding, making the universe larger. If that is the case, and we are on an earth accelerating WITH spacetime, I'm not sure it would be like normal acceleration.   
The Engineer, can you step in here please?
Yes, the expanding universe is not causing objects to undergo acceleration.  It is merely the metric of space that is expanding.  The space is growing between objects without the objects themselves moving.  This means that two objects can have an apparent velocity greater than the speed of light, as it's nothing but the space between them is growing.
That was my thought. Thank you for clearing that up.
So that makes Tom's conclusion incorrect. Tom, you need to come up with another explanation now. I can help...the earth is a sphere created from the gravitational pull of the dust cloud that started our solar system.