How thick is the ice wall?

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Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #30 on: March 14, 2007, 06:16:41 PM »
if antarctica isnt a continent, then wat is it? a land mass? according to google, a continent is
Definitions of continent on the Web:

having control over urination and defecation
one of the large landmasses of the earth; "there are seven continents"; "pioneers had to cross the continent on foot"
the European mainland; "Englishmen like to visit the Continent but they wouldn't like to live there"
celibate: abstaining from sexual intercourse; "celibate priests"
wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

A continent (Latin continere, "to hold together") is a large continuous land mass. The world was first divided into continents by the geographers of Hellenistic Alexandria. Taking Alexandria as a prime meridian, they divided the oikoumene or habitable earth into three parts: Asia was east of Alexandria, Europe was west of Alexandria and north of the Mediterranean Sea, and Libya, known by the Romans as Africa, was west of Alexandria and south of the Mediterranean..
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continent

One of the large, continuous areas of the Earth into which the land surface is divided.
www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/family/geography/glossary.html

The Earth's land masses are divided into 7 large landmasses called continents. The Earth's current continets are: Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America.
www.enchantedlearning.com/explorers/glossary.shtml

one of the seven large land masses on earth
www.oceanadventure.org/po_out.html

large land mass found above sea level
www.msnucleus.org/membership/html/k-6/rc/dictionary/rcdict.html

one of the great divisions of the land on the globe.
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/geogloss.htm

A large landmass composed mostly of granitic rock. Continents rise abruptly above the deep-ocean floor and include the marginal areas submerged beneath sea level.
imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/glossary/letter.asp

A large landmass, as distinct from the oceans. The seven continents are: North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and Antarctica. There are also a group of islands in the Pacific ocean which geographers refer to as Oceania. (Oceania is not a continent.)
www.educationoasis.com/curriculum/Social_Studies/geo/geography_terms.htm

The ability to control urination and bowel movements.
www.birf.info/home/bi-tools/qlinks_c.html

(The 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles) Europe
www.absoluteastronomy.com/encyclopedia/c/co/coimbra_group.htm

A large area of land. There are seven continents: North and South America; Asia; Europe; Africa; Australia; Antarctica.
geographyfieldwork.com/GeographyVocabulary7.htm

any of Earth’s seven principal land masses
www.sitesalive.com/oil/tg/private/oiltgglossary.html

One of the earth's seven huge land masses
ab.mec.edu/curriculum/specproj/rivers/glossary.html

A large land mass rising abruptly from the deep ocean floor, including marginal regions that are shallowly submerged. Continents constitute about one-third of the earth's surface.
www.indiaweather.in/gloss_c.asp

or is google, and all of its contributers a conspiracy too?

say something to that bitch

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #31 on: March 14, 2007, 06:17:48 PM »
if plate tectonics was true in fe, then wouldnt continents jus fall off teh earth?

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #32 on: March 14, 2007, 06:18:18 PM »
Because, Tom, there would be no force under/on the sides of the earth to wedge above whatever is there

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #33 on: March 14, 2007, 06:19:50 PM »
an if you say that the ice wall stops the continents, i swear to god i will find where you life and beat teh living shit outa you. a wall of ice wouldnt be able to stop a continent, the vibrations from teh earthquake caused by the two coliding would crumble the ice wall either way.


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unclegravy

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Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #35 on: March 14, 2007, 10:33:00 PM »
So, how are mountains formed in the FE model again?
The same way they are formed in the RE model. Plate Tectonics.

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Yeah, but Plate Tectonics is not uniform, I mean, it's more random. It seems too improbable that the "edge" of the earth had mountains formed in them by chance.
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Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #36 on: March 15, 2007, 07:37:41 PM »
Even though the ice wall as never been proven to exist..

The RE counterpart to the 150 foot Ice Wall described in the FAQ is called the Ross Ice Shelf. It is a wall of ice that surrounds Antarctica. It is several hundred meters thick. The nearly vertical ice front to the open sea is more than 50 meters high above the water surface. Ninety percent of the floating ice is below the water surface.

The Ross Ice Shelf was named after Sir James Clark Ross, an early 1800's explorer who was among the first to venture to Antarctica in an attempt to determine the position of the South Magnetic Pole. Upon confronting the massive wall of ice stretching perpetually in every direction he famously remarked 'Well, there's no more chance of sailing through that than through the cliffs of Dover.'
The Ross Ice Shelf does not surround Antarctica.  It may be the largest Ice Shelf, but it doesn't not go around the continent.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7e/Antarctica.jpg

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markjo

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Re: RE: Globe vs flat earth
« Reply #37 on: March 25, 2013, 06:30:26 PM »
  :D  I've been following this website for quite some time.
If you've been following this site for so long, then you would probably know better than to reply to a thread that's been inactive for 6 years.
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Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #38 on: March 26, 2013, 10:26:32 PM »
I myself don't believe in the ice wall. I believe that the water is allowed to flow off the side of the earth so that precipitation does not cause the world to flood over.

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #39 on: March 28, 2013, 07:45:22 AM »
I wish we knew. It's unfortunate that the scientific community has been misled and spend their time coming up with theories to a) reconcile a round earth and infinite universe and b) fake space travel, rather than trying to uncover the truths of our universe.

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mathsman

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Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #40 on: March 28, 2013, 08:01:54 AM »
I myself don't believe in the ice wall. I believe that the water is allowed to flow off the side of the earth so that precipitation does not cause the world to flood over.

That would be cool. It would look like the cover of the Yes album Close to the Edge:

http://digilander.libero.it/habelard/yes-close%20to%20the%20edge.jpg

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #41 on: March 28, 2013, 09:04:24 AM »
I myself don't believe in the ice wall. I believe that the water is allowed to flow off the side of the earth so that precipitation does not cause the world to flood over.

That would be cool. It would look like the cover of the Yes album Close to the Edge:

http://digilander.libero.it/habelard/yes-close%20to%20the%20edge.jpg
Utter nonsense. Just like the original post.

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #42 on: March 28, 2013, 09:14:54 AM »
I myself don't believe in the ice wall. I believe that the water is allowed to flow off the side of the earth so that precipitation does not cause the world to flood over.

Isn't that what evaporation is for?  :-\

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #43 on: March 28, 2013, 09:24:45 AM »
I myself don't believe in the ice wall. I believe that the water is allowed to flow off the side of the earth so that precipitation does not cause the world to flood over.

Isn't that what evaporation is for?  :-\
Stop promoting this idiot. An identical topic started by him got moved to Utter Nonsense. Of course, TRUE RET will jump all over this false-flagger (or utterly-stoned moron).

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #44 on: March 28, 2013, 11:17:11 AM »
Suggestion for all RE's and FE's.:

Attend a Star Party at Mc Donald Observatory near Fort Davis, Texas.

Oh.....Sorry !!!!!!.....That's probably a part of the conspiracy too.
Off-topic. I think the original topic had to do with the ice wall. Perhaps you should read it.

As an amateur astronomer, I've been to Fort Davis many times. I like how they have a requirement that people not have lights on at night throughout the county.

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #45 on: March 28, 2013, 11:28:36 AM »
Probably a bit off topic. But surely Mc Donald Observatory would have some photos of the Ice Wall .... Of course, if it exists.
Let's see them then.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #46 on: March 29, 2013, 09:29:21 PM »
How "thick" is the bank of a lake?  It is a silly question, indeed.  The bank of a lake just holds in the water, regardless of "how thick" it is.

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #47 on: March 29, 2013, 09:53:09 PM »
How "thick" is the bank of a lake?  It is a silly question, indeed.  The bank of a lake just holds in the water, regardless of "how thick" it is.

Yet we can still measure the land around the lake to get an answer of exactly how "think" it is based on precise  knowledge of the surrounding land the distance to the nearest water cavity or cliff edge. We have this precise knowledge of the land as opposed to the ice wall, because unlike the ice wall the surrounding land around lake actually exists.

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Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #48 on: March 29, 2013, 09:56:08 PM »
How "thick" is the bank of a lake?  It is a silly question, indeed.  The bank of a lake just holds in the water, regardless of "how thick" it is.

Yet we can still measure the land around the lake to get an answer of exactly how "think" it is based on precise  knowledge of the surrounding land the distance to the nearest water cavity or cliff edge. We have this precise knowledge of the land as opposed to the ice wall, because unlike the ice wall the surrounding land around lake actually exists.

You are trying to compare the banks of a lake to the Ice wall holding the Earth's oceans.  Does this seem a little out of proportion to you?

Re: How thick is the ice wall?
« Reply #49 on: March 29, 2013, 10:11:55 PM »
How "thick" is the bank of a lake?  It is a silly question, indeed.  The bank of a lake just holds in the water, regardless of "how thick" it is.

Yet we can still measure the land around the lake to get an answer of exactly how "think" it is based on precise  knowledge of the surrounding land the distance to the nearest water cavity or cliff edge. We have this precise knowledge of the land as opposed to the ice wall, because unlike the ice wall the surrounding land around lake actually exists.

You are trying to compare the banks of a lake to the Ice wall holding the Earth's oceans.  Does this seem a little out of proportion to you?

Actually, you made the comparison. I showed you the difference.


If you want a comparison that would be in proportion to the ice wall, here are the measurements of Antarctica:
http://www.coolantarctica.com/Antarctica%20fact%20file/antarctica%20fact%20file%20index.htm


To make the point clearer, I could give you more precise measurements of the observable universe than you could of the ice wall. Proportion in your favor.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 10:48:11 PM by Nanite »