Solar Eclipse 21st August

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Re: Solar Eclipse 21st August
« Reply #60 on: Today at 07:43:03 AM »
That's not what the FET states, and it would be impossible for the umbra to change size if the Sun and Moon are of the same size. The only thing that might theoratically change size is the penumbra when strictly following the postulations by FET.
FET states they're approximately the same size, not exactly. That's all I'm using. (And even that can vary between models). Given that the Sun's path varies in radius, altering its height doesn't seem too much of a stretch, that gets you annular eclipses too. The size of the Sun and moon is not the only factor in the size on an eclipse, you've got to deal with the distance between them too.
You've got a working answer, what is it you're complaining about?

That doesn't work like that either on FET and a given size for both Sun and Moon as every eclipse would have be annular when the Moon is smaller and every eclipse would have to be total when the Moon is larger than the Sun (and vice versa), regardless of their respective altitude and relative distance, and we already know both total and annular eclipses have occured in the past. It would only work if at least one of them changes their physical size.

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Jane

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  • RET: Rhombicuboctahedral Earth Theory
Re: Solar Eclipse 21st August
« Reply #61 on: Today at 07:52:59 AM »
regardless of their respective altitude and relative distance
This is just wrong. I don't know what else you expect me to say.

Re: Solar Eclipse 21st August
« Reply #62 on: Today at 11:21:42 AM »
regardless of their respective altitude and relative distance
This is just wrong. I don't know what else you expect me to say.

You're actually right, I have to apologize for that. Total and annular eclipses would be possible on FET when the Moon is smaller than the Sun, and the annual one would never occur when both are the same sizes or the Moon is bigger.
When taken that into consideration it still leaves the fact that the Sun has to be much bigger than postulated in FET so far to effectively draw an umbra of the Moon of 70 miles (it's even been told that the umbra could reach sizes as big as 200 miles across and more) as it is expected in the upcoming eclipse, and for that reason the height above the ground has to be much bigger as well to maintain the observable size which doesn't seem to change that much at all. I do know it does by a tiny fraction because the Earths trajectory around Sun is elliptic.
Another problem here would be the relative distance of the Moon to the Sun during an eclipse as it has to change accordingly over quite some distance whether annual or total eclipse is observed, and considering how little the apparent size of the Moon changes by already recorded observations it leaves some big question marks as well.
« Last Edit: Today at 11:46:28 AM by Sentinel »

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Jane

  • 5397
  • RET: Rhombicuboctahedral Earth Theory
Re: Solar Eclipse 21st August
« Reply #63 on: Today at 12:40:02 PM »
When taken that into consideration it still leaves the fact that the Sun has to be much bigger than postulated in FET so far to effectively draw an umbra of the Moon of 70 miles (it's even been told that the umbra could reach sizes as big as 200 miles across and more) as it is expected in the upcoming eclipse,
Again, that is plain not true. If the moon is no smaller than the Sun then you can easily get an umbra of indefinite size. Just have it close to the Sun and it covers all possible light. Getting a large umbra is not a problem; to reduce it, just bring the moon lower or the Sun higher. For a spotlight Sun as primarily used in FET, there is no problem.

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Another problem here would be the relative distance of the Moon to the Sun during an eclipse as it has to change accordingly over quite some distance whether annual or total eclipse is observed, and considering how little the apparent size of the Moon changes by already recorded observations it leaves some big question marks as well.
Not sure what your argument here is, the distance between the moon and Sun wouldn't change substantially in either model over the course of an eclipse. If you mean the distance between the sun/moon and Earth and how that ought to result in variations in apparent size then sure, but that's an argument independent of eclipses.

Re: Solar Eclipse 21st August
« Reply #64 on: Today at 03:01:27 PM »
Please explain either
         where I am wrong, or
         how this flat earth model is even possible.
As I said before, THINK!
I notice you're ignoring the D in your calculation. What you're saying isn't a response, it's just ignoring what I said.
No, it was a response. You are the one ignoring what is being said.
The D doesn't matter. What matters is the relative sizes.

1) In FET it is IMPOSSIBLE TO EXPLAIN SHAPE AND SIZE OF SHADOW OF MOON DURING ECLIPSES
1 is just wrong as has been covered several times already.
No. It is correct and has been shown to be correct several times and you are yet to refute it.

Which is your problem, not mine. Have the radius of the moon be larger than the Sun, you get total eclipses just fine. Have the altitude of the Sun not be fixed, you get an annular eclipse just fine.
No. You don't.
The ONLY way to get an annular eclipse is with the moon being smaller than the sun.
The only way to get a total eclipse larger than the moon is with the moon being larger than the sun.

This is your problem, not ours.

Again, if the moon is close to the Sun it could theoretically block off all light from it. Lower it, you'd get a smaller and smaller region of darkness until it's your 31.07 miles. Somewhere between the two, you get 70 miles.
Yes, only if it is larger. But that then makes annular eclipses impossible.