Answer me this

  • 3 Replies
  • 1309 Views
?

Aristotle

Answer me this
« on: January 31, 2006, 06:07:56 PM »
A few questions for all you crazies:

If the earth is flat, why can't I not see infinitly across the earth and see this "Ice Wall"?  If everything is perfectly flat, we should be able to see across the ocean.

People have flown across the world, and sailed across the world.  People have been in space.  People can look at the earth through satellites.  Er; how do you explain this?

How do you explain gravity?  Why do things fall to the ground?

I'll post more questions later.

?

Erasmus

  • The Elder Ones
  • 4242
Answer me this
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2006, 07:09:26 PM »
Very succinctly, Ari, flat-Earthers will explain away your objections by making up stories about atmospheric disturbances and government conspiracies.  As for gravity, they state that it is perfectly well explained as a product of the Earth's accelerating upwards at 1g.

But these questions have been asked and debated over many times before in this forum, so I would suggest you look through older threads for more detailed answers.

-Erasmus
Why did the chicken cross the Möbius strip?

?

joffenz

  • The Elder Ones
  • 1272
Answer me this
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2006, 08:26:49 AM »
If the Earth accelerates up at 1g...wouldn't that mean if I drop an object now it will fall slower than if I drop it in a years time?

?

Erasmus

  • The Elder Ones
  • 4242
Answer me this
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2006, 11:12:30 AM »
Quote from: "cheesejoff"
If the Earth accelerates up at 1g...wouldn't that mean if I drop an object now it will fall slower than if I drop it in a years time?


No.

Everything with a material connection to the Earth is accelerating along with it.  If you drop an object at any point in time, it stops accelerating and continues moving upward through space at a constant speed, while the Earth accelerates toward it.  The speed at which at thing appears to fall is the rate of change of the gap between the Earth and that thing; that rate of change always increases at 1g, regardless of when you drop the object.  Thus the gap always has size InitialHeight - g(t-DropTime)^2/2.  That is, the apparent rate of fall of an object depends only on the amount of time that has passed since it was dropped.

Relative to an outside observer who is not accelerating, all objects (even the ones you drop) appear to be rising.  An object dropped earlier appears to them to rise more slowly than an object dropped later.

-Erasmus
Why did the chicken cross the Möbius strip?