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Messages - Stash

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1
Flat Earth General / Re: Dinosaurs: Made In China
« on: Today at 02:23:07 PM »
If you'd like examples pick up the works of Charles Fort.

Or, better yet, just thumb through one of these at the checkout stand...


2
Flat Earth General / Re: Dinosaurs: Made In China
« on: February 20, 2020, 10:50:48 PM »
Of course it was to them. And I'm sure it was normal when it rained frogs in Japan in 2009. I'm sure they found a perfectly reasonable explanation for that.

Maybe the same company in China that creates a fake fossil record are the ones that make it rain frogs in Japan and put dead whales up in the Amazonian mangroves.

3
Flat earthers and real eathers unite to celebrate the truth.

Agreed, if there is one thing that can bring us together it's a doobie passed around and a needle drop on Animals.

4
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Westworld
« on: February 20, 2020, 05:58:05 PM »


Season 3 is gonna be kick ass.

Yeah, I'm psyched. Season 1 was awesome. Season 2, a little bit of a sophomore slump. But Season 3 looks like a glossy blade-runner-esque extravaganza. Maeve v Doloris and swizzle in some Jesse from Breaking Bad, can't go wrong.

5
Day 2 Results (And why shouldn't we lynch Boydster prior to the beginning of every game...):


6
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Please explain my flat earth
« on: February 19, 2020, 10:49:16 PM »
I would like your guys input on this, do you know the answer?

Do you know how to do an internet search? This took all of about 10 seconds to find:

Smart Enclosure using RFID for Inventory Tracking
Inventory tracking for containers such as waste receptacles or storage containers

The NASA Johnson Space Center has developed a method for tracking collections of items in a smart container using radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags with a high level of read accuracy.

Applications
Inventory management
Emergency medical equipment and supplies
Smart shelves, drawers, and containers
Trash receptacles
Medical Storage
Shipping containers
Grocery store shopping carts and conveyor belts
Refrigerator inventory
Security

https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/MSC-TOPS-72

So what's the issue here? NASA has developed a better RFID system than perhaps is already out there. And that's a problem because...
Yeah, smart fridge. I've seen that, it takes readings for your cellphone.

Are you making a point or are you still wondering how the Egyptians built the pyramids and affixed NASA RFID tags to all of the afterworld belongings stored within? Or would you like to talk about NASA smart fridge conspiracies?
If you have any info about said conspiracy, pls come forward with it. Or just continue on with your debunk of anything that isn't in the text book?

I don't have any information about any pyramid/NASA RFID conspiracies and it would appear that you don't either so I'm unclear as to what your point is.

7
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Planes Below the Horizon
« on: February 19, 2020, 10:46:33 PM »
What explanation can flatearthers give for this (excluding the default fake cgi/conspiracy copouts)?


Compelling but to difficult experiment to reproduce...?

Is that a question or an assumption?
Is this a difficult experiment to reproduce?

It seems that's a question better answered by yourself.

8
It has a little bit to do with it. How can we trust such a selfish organization for their word at all? Anyone who has traveled knows not to trust airlines.

If you don't trust the airlines, why would you entrust them to make sure, in every conceivable measure, that your plane doesn't go down?

Do you not fly because of your stance? If you do, wouldn't that make you a hypocrite?

9
One should boycott all airlines; not like it would matter. The governments of the world would just buy out their debt again. They are awful, and have become only more awful after the removal of federal regulations.

Not true. No one bought out Pan Am's debt. And Pan Am became 'America's' airline because of deregulation. They could extend into other corridors rather than just the Caribbean and Pacific.
I'm all for certain gov't regulations, but this has nothing to do with the fact that non-US controlled airlines, e.g., Qantas, LATAM, are shoving passengers out of their planes at altitude over the southern oceans so as to dupe the rest of the world that they have flights from S.America to Australia/Africa in an effort to preserve the fact that erroneously the world is much like a globe.

10
Flat Earth General / Re: Dinosaurs: Made In China
« on: February 19, 2020, 04:34:20 PM »

11
I like how Mr Cruton actually looks like he is in pain.

That was part of the intent. Trust no one...

12
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Dem Watch 2020
« on: February 19, 2020, 02:41:04 PM »
We're fucking doomed.

Pretty much the only sentiment that has been swirling around in my head for months.

I can literally only envision 4 more years of MAGA at the rate/quality of the Dem opponents out there.

13
Results from Night 1 (In honor of my own less than honorable death, a little fun with photoshop):


14
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Dark Moon
« on: February 19, 2020, 01:09:58 PM »
I assume then you think these oysters close their shells for fun?

The article makes it clear that the oysters are not trying to avoid moon light. Whatever causes them to open and close their shells, is clearly not a fear of any danger in the light. It could easily be something as simple as more abundant food during the full moon, and less abundant during new moon, and they need to open wider when there's less food. There's zero evidence that they're afraid of moon light. And there's abundant evidence that people expose themselves to moon light with no ill effects.

Anomaly-hunting is not science.
It makes no such thing clear. It simply says that lack of the light does not affect them; this would make sense if it was a learned behavior or if it developed due to a queue that the danger would be likely to present itself. Perhaps tides.

The article states:

"So why would the oysters care about the phases of the moon? Laura Payton, a co-author of the study from the University of Bordeaux, tells Davis at The Guardian she has a guess. “We know that oysters open their valves when there is food,” she says, and previous research has shown that the movement of plankton, which oysters filter out of seawater and consume, is influenced by moonlight."

It mentions nothing about 'danger', 'harmful', whatever. You literally are making up the notion that "oysters are afraid of moonlight..." or the like based upon nothing.
It does mention nothing about that. But I am making up my "guess" as much so as she made up her "guess." Mine obviously fits within the argument I am making, and hers her argument. Funny enough, the fact that plankton is influenced by moonlight also supports my general hypothesis. As things are stated, we seem to be on even ground.

I hardly think you are on even ground with Dr Laura Payton, Postdoctoral researcher, Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI), her bio:
I am a postdoctoral researcher based at the University of Oldenburg and the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI). I work on biological rhythms and endogenous molecular clocks in marine organisms, i.e. how organisms are adapted to their cyclic ecosystem and temporally organize accordingly.

Her 'guess' is based upon previous scientific research/studies and her own work as a Phd in the field.

Your 'guess' is based upon making things up that don't appear in the research presented.


15
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Dark Moon
« on: February 19, 2020, 12:21:50 PM »
I assume then you think these oysters close their shells for fun?

The article makes it clear that the oysters are not trying to avoid moon light. Whatever causes them to open and close their shells, is clearly not a fear of any danger in the light. It could easily be something as simple as more abundant food during the full moon, and less abundant during new moon, and they need to open wider when there's less food. There's zero evidence that they're afraid of moon light. And there's abundant evidence that people expose themselves to moon light with no ill effects.

Anomaly-hunting is not science.
It makes no such thing clear. It simply says that lack of the light does not affect them; this would make sense if it was a learned behavior or if it developed due to a queue that the danger would be likely to present itself. Perhaps tides.

The article states:

"So why would the oysters care about the phases of the moon? Laura Payton, a co-author of the study from the University of Bordeaux, tells Davis at The Guardian she has a guess. “We know that oysters open their valves when there is food,” she says, and previous research has shown that the movement of plankton, which oysters filter out of seawater and consume, is influenced by moonlight."

It mentions nothing about 'danger', 'harmful', whatever. You literally are making up the notion that "oysters are afraid of moonlight..." or the like based upon nothing.

16
Flat Earth General / Re: Dinosaurs: Made In China
« on: February 18, 2020, 04:11:03 PM »
Actually bigger objects tend to have a higher volume to surface area ratio.
Yes, but larger beasts, those bordering on the mythical if not, require higher utilized energy to food ratios.

What's your estimation for what that ratio may be for these creatures in question?

17
Didnt spacex spit out a 50M reward?

Not sure about that, but NASA coughed up $40m+ back in October for R&D:

"NASA awards $43.2M to Blue Origin, SpaceX and others for tech to take us to the Moon and Mars"
https://techcrunch.com/2019/10/01/nasa-awards-43-2m-to-blue-origin-spacex-and-others-for-tech-to-take-us-to-the-moon-and-mars/

As well the group that built what is now the Virgin Galactic rig won the $10m X Prize some years back.

There's plenty of funding out there for legitimate endeavors in stark contrast to this 'challenge'.

18
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Dark Moon
« on: February 18, 2020, 02:32:36 PM »
Oysters close their shells to shield themselves from the harmful effects of the full moon.
You have provided no evidence that:
  • "Oysters" do "close their shells" at "the full moon" (But I have quoted a report that they are "more closed".) nor that
  • even If they do "close their shells" at "the full moon" the the reason is "to shield themselves from the harmful effects of the full moon."
This seems far more plausible:
Quote from: Jason Daley, SMITHSONIANMAG.COM
Oysters Open and Close Their Shells as the Moon Wanes and Waxes
A new study suggests the mollusks may widen and narrow their shells depending on movement of plankton, which shifts with the lunar cycle.

 a new study published in the journal Biology Letterssuggests oysters are one of the creatures that keep tabs on the moon, and that the lunar cycle influences how widely they open their shells.

Nicola Davis at The Guardian reports that researchers discovered the oysters’ lunar love affair after tracking 12 Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, that they submerged along the French coast. They then watched them carefully through three lunar cycles, each of which lasts 29.5 days. Using electrodes, they measured how widely the oysters opened their shells every 1.6 seconds, then compared that data with data about the moon’s cycle.

They found the oysters paid attention to the phases of the moon: as the moon was waxing, or growing fuller, the oysters narrowed their shells—never closing them completely. And when the moon started waning, or receding to the new moon phase, they widened their shells back up.

What that suggests is the oysters may rely on a internal lunar clock rather than direct cues, like the intensity of the moonlight. If that was the case, they would open their shells equally during the first quarter moon and the last quarter moon since the intensity of the light would be similar. But the oysters reacted differently to those phases suggesting they are following an internal calendar rather than reacting to the moonlight itself.

Yes clearly they learned the schedule and know when to expect danger.

No where is there any indication of expected 'danger'. You literally just made that up.

19
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Planes Below the Horizon
« on: February 18, 2020, 02:27:16 PM »
An artificial horizon is one made by anything other than the curvature of the earth. This would be all horizons.

It is created by the apparent height of close by waves compared to the apparent height of far away planes, ships, etc.

The problem with your explanation is that in the video the author makes a distinct point of showing that there are no close-by waves, none at all. The observer is 60cm above the water, the tarmac is 2.5m above the water and the A320 is 12m tall and completely disappears. Somehow close-by waves that don't exist would have to obscure 14.5m. No such water barrier is seen in the video. Re-watch it and let us know what your thoughts are.

20

There is still debate as to where "space", but 50 miles is recognized by the US.

To win my Challenge you have to get to the Moon and/or planet Mars.
If you do it, I'll pay you €1M (topic).
Getting to the moon or mars will cost many billions more than winning your "challenge" would pay.
You are right.
So it is not possible!

Fortunately we already spent the money:

In 1973, NASA submitted congressional testimony reporting the total cost of Project Apollo as $25.4 billion (about $153 billion in 2018 dollars).

So we don't need your paltry non-existent €1M.

21
Day 1 Results:


22
Were they killed?

Sadly, according to wise, all souls on this daily flight are lost, presumably pushed out of the cabin at altitude into the pacific as soon as the plane is sufficiently offshore.

23
Firstly, wind can not affect an aircraft to cause two hours delay. Forget it, it is imposible.
Every actual pilot in the world would disagree. Direct contradicting example: There were a few flights just last week flying from New York to London that hit 200 mph tailwinds and arrived 2 hours earlier than scheduled. Flights in the opposite direction were late along the same route. Wind DOES affect airplanes in flight whether you agree or not.
No, they do not. Accepting or denying something does not cancel their driving licence. They are some flat earther pilots and they are in the category of every. How can it be? Stop to baseless claims, or your claims based on wrong pre acceptations.
Even a flat Earther pilot would agree that wind affects the aircraft.
Not all of them.
then they wouldn't be a good pilot. It is a basic fact that wind affects an aircraft in flight and is necessary to understand to be able to land. I'd challenge you to prove your "Not all of them" by naming some but I'm betting you'll ignore this.
No, they are best pilots. They are using flat earth routes and spending less fuel.

Who might theses pilots be? And how are they following flat earth routes when there is no such thing as a flat earth map?

There is one numerical map, here. https://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=74162.0

Just because the map is not similar to other maps does not mean that it is not a map. I suggest better routes to pilots when they ask and they earn very well from this job. So far, no pilot has been the victim of these recommendations but benefited.

The effort put into your map notwithstanding, it's not something anyone could use to effectively plot a course, especially via the air. It's not just pilots who need to plot and calculate routes, other entities do as well, e.g., air traffic control. And ATC must do so across radar regions defined all over the world. Coordinated, controlled via maps. Maps that are not yours.

So there aren't any commercial pilots out there saying to ATC:

Pilot: This is BA117 from LHR en route to Munich contacting Frankfurt Tower
Frankfurt ATC: BA117, have you on scope
Pilot: Ok Frankfurt, we're following a map based upon a flat earth devised by a Turkish gentleman so our route will be a straight line from Heathrow to Munich regardless of wind, weather, parity in distance, or any other air traffic you need to coordinate. Copy?
Frankfurt ATC: BA117, copy that. We will divert all other globe earth traffic so as not to interfere with yours.

Saying that commercial pilots have used your map is a seeming virtual impossibility. Do you have any evidence of it?
there are flat earther pilots I know and they are constantly under pressure. therefore, I refuse to share personal information or any of related content. I have already shared it enough.

Of course, under pressure to use standardized maps/routes, etc., all based upon a globe earth. Because they have to. Commercial pilots and ATC around the world can't just be using whatever map suits their whimsy.

That being the point, you claimed, "They (flat earth pilots) are using flat earth routes and spending less fuel." which is the definition of a baseless claim.
I ask for evidence of your claim - There is none = Baseless claim.

Again, I applaud the effort you put into your map. But, unfortunately, the underlying methodology is deeply flawed and it has no real world application.

I cannot prove such a thing without informing about them. but there is proof that logic.

they go out of the radar area after a while, especially in ocean-going journeys. the next route is completely predictive. At this point, pilots can use the route they know if they want. this route may be suitable for the flat earth map. this information is evidence, but flight data is required for more details. there can not be an evidence of such a thing.
Passengers will be able to track and record their route using a smartphone or GNSS receiver.  Do you have details of such a record?

Passengers will be able to track and record their route using a smartphone or GNSS receiver. 

Did you ever think why anybody do not have such a record between Australia and South America flights?

Here's a record from just yesterday:


24
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Please explain my flat earth
« on: February 17, 2020, 10:17:03 PM »
I would like your guys input on this, do you know the answer?

Do you know how to do an internet search? This took all of about 10 seconds to find:

Smart Enclosure using RFID for Inventory Tracking
Inventory tracking for containers such as waste receptacles or storage containers

The NASA Johnson Space Center has developed a method for tracking collections of items in a smart container using radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags with a high level of read accuracy.

Applications
Inventory management
Emergency medical equipment and supplies
Smart shelves, drawers, and containers
Trash receptacles
Medical Storage
Shipping containers
Grocery store shopping carts and conveyor belts
Refrigerator inventory
Security

https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/MSC-TOPS-72

So what's the issue here? NASA has developed a better RFID system than perhaps is already out there. And that's a problem because...
Yeah, smart fridge. I've seen that, it takes readings for your cellphone.

Are you making a point or are you still wondering how the Egyptians built the pyramids and affixed NASA RFID tags to all of the afterworld belongings stored within? Or would you like to talk about NASA smart fridge conspiracies?

25
I feel like some slanderous things are being said right now and it's important to make very clear: someone is trying to manipulate the fragile minds of those who would listen to their words. Are we murdering anyone on this fine day? Because I'm going to go ahead and nominate Jura on principle. I know, I know, I hear the words in your head already... "But boydster, surely we should kill you, you clever, sexy beast. Fool me once, shame on me. Fool me again and again, well fuck you buddy, I'm gonna shoot you in the face this time and then burn your body and pee on the ashes." And I get it. Yes, there is some merit to that plan. But the Jura play, it's a great move. Let's talk about why. Jura is a smart, brash, strategic, yet also unpredictable player. A Bad Jura is very bad for all of us. Bad Jura should die. A Good Jura is great for everyone, but that is offset by Bad Jura's badness. A Ghost Jura ensures that Bad Jura doesn't get to kill people, and also enables Good Jura to do god's work and lead the people to victory.

But if we aren't killing anyone on the first day, then disregard.

A compelling argument even from a disastrously diabolical pathological liar such as yourself. However, your sexiness notwithstanding, your beastly nature and what you deem as 'clever' is no more than how to effectively wield a hand tool, such as a pick axe, against a granite substrate cracking veins of ore, blood, and fire, I proffer this: For the greater good of humanity, going against the tide as of late that has swelled to a maelstrom:

[I vote to lynch Boydster]

26
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Dark Moon
« on: February 17, 2020, 01:37:23 PM »
Oysters close their shells to shield themselves from the harmful effects of the full moon.

Please cite the research stating that there are harmful effects and that oysters are shielding themselves because of said harmful effects.

27
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Please explain my flat earth
« on: February 16, 2020, 03:41:10 PM »
I would like your guys input on this, do you know the answer?

Do you know how to do an internet search? This took all of about 10 seconds to find:

Smart Enclosure using RFID for Inventory Tracking
Inventory tracking for containers such as waste receptacles or storage containers

The NASA Johnson Space Center has developed a method for tracking collections of items in a smart container using radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags with a high level of read accuracy.

Applications
Inventory management
Emergency medical equipment and supplies
Smart shelves, drawers, and containers
Trash receptacles
Medical Storage
Shipping containers
Grocery store shopping carts and conveyor belts
Refrigerator inventory
Security

https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/MSC-TOPS-72

So what's the issue here? NASA has developed a better RFID system than perhaps is already out there. And that's a problem because...

28
Flat Earth General / Re: The Big 90 Degree Triangle Bit
« on: February 16, 2020, 01:53:59 AM »
Wise link looks legit

Which one and how so?

29
Flat Earth Debate / Re: Planes Below the Horizon
« on: February 16, 2020, 01:52:03 AM »
What explanation can flatearthers give for this (excluding the default fake cgi/conspiracy copouts)?


Compelling but to difficult experiment to reproduce...?

Is that a question or an assumption?

30

At low velocities say 100 m/s a blunt nose deflects the air it encounters and there is no shock wave. The relative velocity nose/air at the nose 0 but the pressure is quite high.
But increase the velocity to say 1 000 m/s, there is still no shock wave and the pressure on the nose increses a lot and ... the nose is deformed and destroyed.
Easy to verify in any wind tunnel, if you can find one producing that wind speed. There is none in the USA but Russia has a secret one somewhere built in the 1950's, if you believe old communist propaganda

More lies from Heiwa. Or just more proof of his inability to research.

Multiple transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic wind tunnels in the US listed here
This one has been in operation for over 65 years.
Here is a US company that sells supersonic wind tunnels.

Why should ANYONE believe anything you say when it is clear you are incapable of researching even the most basic of concepts?
Well, just ask anyone of them to confirm that at supersonic Mach 5-10 a vehicle with a blunt nose experiences a shock wave that slows it down! What is the force acting on the vehicle? Shouldn't the force deform and heat up the vehicle? Etc, etc. NASA seems to have plenty of supersonic wind tunnels! Why isn't one enough?

Again, hilarious. You make a whole bunch of claims, e.g., "There is none (transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic wind-tunnels) in the USA..." You are immediately shown to be wrong and your rebuttal is, "Why isn't one (transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic wind-tunnel) enough?"

Comedy gold. You should take this bit on the road. You're a silly, silly man.

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