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Messages - LovesLinguistics

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The Lounge / Absurdity on the Internet forums
« on: September 23, 2017, 01:18:28 PM »
‎What's the most absurd conversation you've encountered on an Internet forum? Here is one of my favorites:
https://‎linguistforum.com/historical-linguistics/was-latin-ever-a-spoken-language/

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I think I would have patience if only intikam even responded to the arguments as they were made.

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Suggestions & Concerns / Re: Attracting linguists
« on: September 17, 2017, 11:55:17 AM »
What's funny there?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: September 17, 2017, 11:53:02 AM »
Well, you know, there is a lot of evidence that teaching phonology early in schools helps children learn how to spell (It's called phonics.).

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: September 12, 2017, 10:38:29 PM »
What do you guys think, would teaching linguistics in schools (not prescriptive grammar, but the actual linguistics, like the things we were discussing here) help students learn foreign languages more easily?

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Suggestions & Concerns / Re: Attracting linguists
« on: September 11, 2017, 10:22:59 PM »
You just want to create an impression that the conspiracy theorists are smart guys, right?

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Suggestions & Concerns / Re: Attracting linguists
« on: September 04, 2017, 08:41:02 PM »
You think it's likely that another linguist will come before that thread falls into oblivion? And we can probably compete with linguistforum at being a good forum for discussing linguistics. The only currently active members on linguistforum are, as can be easily seen, FlatAssembler (almost certainly that same not-so-serious guy as here) and Daniel.

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Suggestions & Concerns / Re: Attracting linguists
« on: September 03, 2017, 08:23:11 PM »
Look, guys, it would probably be a good idea to have some sort of "Hall of Fame" for threads on this forum, to show people it's possible to have some relatively long and productive conversation here. You are lucky to have a thread that, if sticked, will probably attract linguists in the future. If you don't want it, if you want people to think all you can do here is "discuss" conspiracy theories, fine.

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: September 03, 2017, 07:17:55 AM »
Well, yes, I made some easy-to-understand statistical approximation to explain my point. Or do you think that FlatAssembler is right?

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Suggestions & Concerns / Re: Attracting linguists
« on: August 30, 2017, 03:56:51 AM »
Quote from: FlatAssembler
We will probably also attract people who will write nonsense about linguistics.
If people who would be involved in a discussion see that the first post is some technical stuff about the laryngeal theory, they will probably be deterred from writing something stupider than that, don't you think? That's exactly why I suggested sticking the thread.
Quote from: SpaceCowGirl
It's the Flat Earth Society, we'd like to attract people interested in discussing the earth. People who come here with other interests are a bonus, but we're not going to do anything specifically to get more linguists to post.
Well, many people on this forum say they like to read the discussions about linguistics.
Quote from: Boots
I'm a cunning linguist.
So, why aren't you active in discussions about linguistics?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 30, 2017, 03:29:15 AM »
I think that FlatAssembler is falling to a trap called "The Birthday Paradox". If you choose a random person, the probability of that person having the same birthday as you do is only 1/365=0.27%. However, if you choose 20 random people, the probability of some of them sharing a birthday is not 1-((1-(1/365))ˆ20)=5.3%, as would appear at the first glance, but is actually 1-((1-(1/365))ˆ(20*20))=66.6%.
The same goes for phonemes on the Swadesh list. The probability of there being any particular apparent regular sound correspondence, like s:q or r:l, is very low. But if there are twenty phonemes, and twenty times twenty potential correspondences, you will probably find one if you search.

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 21, 2017, 04:20:39 AM »
To me it seems more like that *s (s-mobile) was disproportionately common in the beginning of a word in PIE and that *q was disproportionately common in the beginning of a word in PAN, rather than that PIE *s actually corresponds to PAN *q. Also, you realize how much PIE and PAN were different grammatically, including the phonotactics (let's ignore the fact that their homelands were VERY far away from each other)?
To me it seems like you are a victim of the Bongo-Bongo effect, or are just trolling.

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 19, 2017, 02:16:16 PM »
That's an excellent example of a common effect in linguistics, called metonymy!

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 19, 2017, 01:28:46 PM »
Or maybe we could rename this thread to "Discussing linguistics" (or something like that) and stick it. And someone who looks at the first few posts would realize that it's not about something extremely pseudoscientific. What do you think?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 19, 2017, 01:15:23 PM »
Well, I assume you will be honest and not make the linguist you invite think we've actually had a huge thread discussing the Laryngeal Theory in greatest possible details, will you?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 19, 2017, 12:46:31 PM »
Then you could become one. Or, better yet, just read a few blog posts about interesting etymologies and tell us which etymology you liked the most. Later you could invite someone active on forums about linguistics to join us here, but I don't know if they would like to join a forum named "The Flat Earth Society".

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 19, 2017, 02:50:20 AM »
So, whom all on this forum do you consider a "word nerd"?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 18, 2017, 12:23:11 PM »
Then watching some vlogs about linguistics, like Xidnaf, would probably be more interesting to you.

And I am also not sure how much FalseProphet really enjoys discussing technical stuff in linguistics with people like FlatAssembler.

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 18, 2017, 11:03:49 AM »
Really? Nobody?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 14, 2017, 09:59:54 AM »
Let's change the topic to a bit less serious one. So, what are your favourite etymologies, guys? I have got several of them, everyone laughs when I tell them, but they are most likely true. One is the Proto-Indo-European word for catfish, *skwolos (whence English "whale"), being derived from *skwel (to shine), because catfish doesn't have scales and its skin "shines". One is the Bosnian word for red, "crven", derived from the Proto-Slavic word for worm, because they used to make the red colour from worms. The last one of mine is the word "gymnasium", coming from the Greek word for "naked", "gymnos", because the Spartans used to exercise a lot in their schools, and Ancient Greeks exercised naked. Your etymology doesn't have to be mainstream, but it has to be plausible. For example, supposed radical mistranslations aren't plausible.

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 06, 2017, 02:03:38 PM »
So, why do you think Proto-Indo-European and Proto-Uralic would have to be more distantly related than Italian and Hindi? If you counted the words that started with a d in Italian and how many of them have a dictionary translation to Hindi that starts with a d, you wouldn't get a statistically significant result, would you?

I thought that "gift" was actually English "give"+"-t". So that 'v' changed to 'f' because of devoicing caused by the following 't', much like in "leave"-"left". So, I thought, since English 'v' corresponds to German 'b', and English 't' corresponds to German 'z' or 'ss', English "gift" and German "Gift" can't be real cognates.

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 06, 2017, 12:22:49 PM »
It's one of the bases of the Amerind hypothesis. Supporters of Indo-Uralic often appeal to it in response to the argument that -m in 1st person and -t/s in 2nd person are cross-linguistic tendencies. I must admit I haven't looked into it.

Anyway, how do you mean that English "gift" and German "Gift" are cognates? Wouldn't a German cognate to English "gift" be "Gibze" or "Gebze"?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 06, 2017, 01:51:08 AM »
The first person singular -m is not that common. In the native American languages, the endings for 1st and 2nd person are usually -n and -m. And why would the proto-language have to go so far back in time?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 05, 2017, 12:37:59 PM »
Anyway, when you were discussing Indo-European grammar, you somehow assumed that Indo-Uralic hypothesis is certainly wrong, that it's absurd to say that Finnish grammar is related to the Latin grammar. Why do you think that's the case?

I have looked into it a bit, and it seems fairly reasonable. The similarities are fairly systematic. For instance, in both PIE and Proto-Uralic does accusative singular and 1st person singular present end with *m, interrogative pronouns and conjunctive enclitic start with the same sound in both languages, in PIE it's *kw, in Uralic it's *k, and there are a few other such correspondences in grammar. Personal pronouns also sound almost identical… You think this can all be just a coincidence?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 05, 2017, 01:13:59 AM »
A weird guy even for this forum, ain't ye?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 05, 2017, 12:53:47 AM »
It's not like we've been discussing the Laryngeal Theory all along. So, you are not sure if the Earth is round or flat? At least you are being honest with yourself then.

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 04, 2017, 04:22:46 AM »
Nobody here is really interested in the Laryngeal Theory, I can see. No wonder. It's primarily about accentology, and I am having problems getting the accents right even in my own language. I can imagine nobody here tried to pronounce an ancient language with a right accent.
So, tell me something about yourselves, guys!
I see FlatAssembler likes to talk about linguistics and informatics. When it comes to linguistics, he will talk even if he doesn't have anything smart to say, and I guess that the same is about informatics. As can be seen from the thread he linked to in his signature, he also likes to make fun of the conspiracy theorists.
FalseProphet is a professional linguist, and he is, unlike most linguists, deeply interested in linguistics. He knows in details things that aren't in his field. He is also somewhat interested in philosophical idealism, when he says in his signature "Life is just a tale". Why exactly did he choose a nickname "False Prophet"?
I can't figure out much about SpaceCowGirl or Crutonius. SpaceCowGirl probably believes that the Earth is flat, right? What about Crutonius? What are your other interests?

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 03, 2017, 11:48:15 AM »
Though I can't really amaze you with my study of the Bosnian toponyms, because I haven't done any. I only know that Bosnia was originally a river name, probably derived from Proto-Indo-European word *bhogj-nu (in Bosnian it's translated to mean "tečnost", perhaps that'd be rendered in English as "flowness" or "fluid").

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 03, 2017, 11:34:19 AM »
If he has learned about linguistics from the Internet, he is pretty much a member of the same Internet culture we are.
My native language is Bosnian, by the way, which is fairly similar to Croatian.

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Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Alternative to the laryngeal theory
« on: August 03, 2017, 10:44:45 AM »
I am also not a professional linguist. But errors made by self-taught linguists are usually the likes of "Finnish probably borrowed its pronouns from Russian." or "The Latin word 'habere' and the English word 'have' are cognates". Claiming that laryngeals were equivalents of the semi-vowels without explaining the supposed conditioning rules is more of an error in logic than a lack of knowledge of linguistics.

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