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Messages - Pezevenk

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1
The Lounge / Re: Rabinoz Memorial
« on: Today at 04:39:18 AM »
I'll definitely miss that zany post formatting. It became an endearing quality, especially when he would go over the top and make it look like newspaper columns.
Yeah I always loved the formatting, my favorite was when he gave a different font to the exclamation marks.

2
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 08:07:49 AM »
So to recap:

  • He defrauded and extorted around 58k from various sites by hacking into their user bases and making demands
  • He was supposed to receive 1k per complaint for around 100 complaints he deleted. I don't know exactly how much he received because Submit got busted and the bank blocked the payments.
  • He did a DDOS attack against some telecom company, not sure what the motive was. He was busted and arrested in May 2017.
  • All his crimes were committed between the ages of 14 and 17. In May 2017, when he was arrested, he was still 17.
  • After his arrest, FBI said they suspected him of the ROR hack.
  • He was pre-jailed for around 18 months before he managed to post bail.
  • The sentence he was facing in Cyprus was around what he had already served, I imagine the law factored in the fact he was a minor.
  • At some point the US requested his extradition, Cyprus agreed, so he was arrested again earlier this year.
  • He was extradited a few days ago and he is facing a sentence of 20 years.

So there is exactly what happened.

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That is conspiracy to commit bank fraud.

Right, I didn't notice that. However he doesn't seem to be charged for that. Maybe the courts decided it weighed mostly SEO or he was only charged in Cyprus for that, since the US doesn't really care what he did to a bank in Cyprus. Or maybe it wasn't one of the more serious offenses and it wasn't brought up. Idk.

3
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 07:50:49 AM »
I called it dirty money the first time. Jesus Christ. So fine, not stolen money. And thatís still something to the tune of $100k in TOTALLY NOT STOLEN BUT STILL ILLEGAL MONEY. And you bring up another great point, in that he also attempted to commit bank fraud. So thatís another thing that he thinks is totally OK to do. This is still not the story you started painting in your OP, a tale of some poor kiddo who really likes computers that accidentally found himself on the wrong side of the law and all the big bad mean people in uniforms came to take him away unfairly. He did some really bad things. And he did a lot of it at an age where his moral compass is already pretty firmly established.

I still donít think Iím of the mind that he should have been extradited. But I can absolutely see how a case was made for it to happen.

You said:

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He didn't just steal $45k, or $90k. He illegally took in over $300k, possibly over $500k, in money, just in the crimes he was caught committing.


Which is why I thought you meant he stole 300-500k.

He didn't attempt to commit bank fraud, idk where you got that from. The bank blocked the payment because Submit got busted making illegal payments, it didn't have anything to do with defrauding the bank and he is not charged of committing bank fraud or attempting to commit bank fraud. You are interpreting many of my posts very wrong.

4
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 07:43:12 AM »
Also idk about Cyprus but I am pretty sure that here minors being tried as adults is not legally a thing. There are no special rules about extradition of minors though. However Cyprus has a difference, in that they changed their constitution in 2013 so that they can extradite their own citizens. They couldn't do that before, so I don't know what rules they have there because they're probably different to ours (we still can't extradite our own citizens).

5
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 07:30:12 AM »
It's in the source you provided. I posted the quote and the image already.

It's not, you misinterpreted the source. I just made a post detailing exactly what he is charged with.

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the amount he charged for each deleted record. It was $3k-$5k per record,

HE didn't charge that money, Submit Express charged that money from the businesses that paid them to do that. He was supposed to be paid around 1k per complaint by Submit Express. From what I gather he didn't receive all of that because Submit got busted and the banks blocked the payments. Furthermore he didn't steal that money from ROR as you seemed to say in that other post, he got it (illegally) from Submit.

 
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I guess without actually knowing what he actually did time for, you've set this up in such a way that it's impossible to really have a discussion.

He didn't technically yet do time for anything, since he wasn't sentenced yet. However the sentence he ended up facing in Cyprus before they decided to extradite him was no more than what he had already done so he wouldn't have to do more prison time. I imagine he would have to pay restitutions and compensations though.

6
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 07:17:18 AM »
Yep, according to the articles I found, his extortion attempts yielded a sum total of 58k dollars in Bitcoin from all the victims combined. At least that is what he is charged for. However the victims claim he caused a total of 530k dollars in damage. He also took money from a management company called Submit Express that was paying him to remove reports on ROR at the request of the company's clients. The clients paid Submit Express 3-5k but he was supposed to be getting 1k per report. I am not sure how much of that money he actually ended up getting because according to articles a bank from Cyprus blocked the payments, but the total money they found on him was 69k, although I imagine he might have more in Bitcoin, while part of the money they found may have been legitimate. The articles are also not clear on whether or not there were other unknown hackers involved or if he acted alone. He was arrested on May 2017, and it seems like now he will be tried in two different states, Arizona and Georgia.

7
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 06:48:19 AM »
He didn't just steal $45k, or $90k. He illegally took in over $300k, possibly over $500k, in money, just in the crimes he was caught committing.
Idk where you saw that but that is wrong. The sites affected claim the damages caused to them were 500k in total, not that he took in 500k, if that is what you are referring to. Him and his co-conspirators also earned money by deleting bad reviews, but that money was NOT defrauded from ROR, but was voluntarily (but illegally) given to them by various businesses who allegedly paid them to do so. It seems extremely unlikely that he actually got that much money for himself. From what I have read he definitely didn't get all of his extortion money and I don't even know for sure if he got any at all, but sources aren't very clear on that.


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If Cyprus leaves people in jail for 18 months without having a trial, then take the issue up with Cyprus for having a legal system that would allow such a thing.
Most systems allow for something like that. Trials may take a very long time to be completed and many people can't pay bail for one or the other reason. I don't know for sure but I imagine they asked some absurd amount for bail. My understanding however is that if he was sentenced to 1.5 years, having already served that he wouldn't have to serve any more, but it is extremely probable he would be obliged to pay restitution.

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Even if they came here from Cyprus, they should get in trouble for that.
He did get in trouble for that already before they decided to extradite him. That's the point.

8
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 06:13:15 AM »
I'm not even sure what the argument is even supposed to be here, that the victims shouldn't be compensated in any way, but the perpetrator should be punished more severely because that will make it better for some reason? Because unless that is his position I don't understand why he is so annoyed by the concept of restitution and compensation. Like, is it better if they just lock him up so that he has no way of making money, and thus no way to pay up any time soon?

9
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 04:44:29 AM »
Because they are less severe?
How are violent crimes less "severe". What are you using to judge how "severe" something is?

I thought that was generally consensus, and actually represented in the punishments many different justice systems around the world have decided are appropriate for each crime, but apparently not?

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Not by those who have been damaged by it.
Sure, they can make more money, but they can't just magically replace was has been taken.

Did you even read my post? I directly answered that, I'm not gonna keep doing this. I told you they can be paid restitution.

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What's the difference, either way I lose $100k.

Idk man, most people would care if they lost 100k by a scam or if someone broke into their home and threatened their family with a gun to do that. But maybe you have a different opinion. 

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Raped in what way?
I would say there are plenty of ways in which someone can be raped which are less damaging than losing $100k.

Lmao.

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You mean like an extreme case of stealing a lot of money?

An extreme case of stealing/scamming lots of money from hundreds of people and causing them serious damage. Not defrauding money from 2-3 entities that can be repaid relatively easily.

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And when he can't afford to pay it? What happens then?

Already answered, you'd know if you paid attention to what you're answering to, moving on.

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And the non-financial damages?

What non-financial damages?

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Why should they?
Why should Cyrpus and the innocent people of Cyprus pay for the crimes for this individual?

You know states do that all the time, right? Many courts pay money to entities harmed before the perpetrators can pay, and then the perpetrators are forced to pay back the court anyways, so the courts don't lose.

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Why shouldn't the criminal be thrown "under the bus".

Because criminals are citizens too and their countries protect them?

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And if you are so happy with allowing courts to decide he can get away with it with some other way to pay it back, why aren't you happy allowing the US courts to decide that?

Because being tried in a foreign court carries all sorts of different issues with it, and it seems like the US courts are determined to punish him extremely severely.

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With that attitude, so can every crime.
Had a loved one murdered, don't worry, they can just pay some money.
Hijacked a few planes and flew them into buildings, don't worry, they can just pay some money.

That's why I specified the crimes were non violent and the damage was strictly financial, you genius. Jesus christ.

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So like having lots of money taken from you?
No. Unless it caused a huge amount of damage (for example ending up homeless, being forced to shut down business and fire lots of people, etc), which it didn't, in any of those cases. Even then, it is much easier to restore that kind of damage than a serious violent offense.

10
The Lounge / Re: I have very sad news. Rabinoz has passed away.
« on: August 03, 2020, 03:47:37 AM »
Perhaps a memorial thread for such a long dear member is in order?
That's a pretty good idea, actually!

11
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 03:44:20 AM »
Your own source shows that he was arrested in February 2018.

That source was inaccurate, more respectable sources mention he was arrested in 2017. I can post them here but they are in Greek.
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Why should "non-violent" crimes be treated less severely?

Because they are less severe?

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Just because violence wasn't used doesn't mean it can't cause serious damage.

Financial damage, which can be repaired in a straightforward way.

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If anything, some violent crimes should be less. For example, what would you rather have happen to you, someone punch you in the face and give you a bruise, or have $100k stolen from you? I'd prefer the punch to the face.

Which would you rather have, being defrauded 100k or being robbed of 100k? Would you prefer to lose 100k or being raped? Yes, there are violent offenses less severe than non violent ones. But the most severe offenses are more or less always violent ones, and the only ones that should qualify for throwing you in jail for decades, barring extreme cases of non violent offenses.

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Is he repairing it? No.
So no, it can't just magically be repaired.

He will probably be forced by a court to repair it anyways, that's the point. There's all sorts of ways this might happen. Some courts actually immediately pay the money to the entity harmed, and then the perpetrator has some sort of debt to the state that they can repay in a few different ways, if they can't repay it immediately. Idk what the legislation on that is in the US but I doubt the victims are going away from this with nothing. I am sure Cyprus could reach an agreement with the US to pay back the money instead of throwing their citizen under the bus and extraditing him. Also I am sure someone who is as skilled with computers and hacking from such a young age as him could repay the debt in many different ways, if that was what the court ruled, instead of ending up in jail for 20 more years in addition to the 1.5 he did in Cyprus.

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And from the sounds of the allegations, it sounds like someone didn't pay the blackmail demands and instead got very large costs as a result of whatever it was that they were being blackmailed with. So I doubt that can get "repaired".

It can, as long as the court rules it so.

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So just what do you think constitutes "grave harm"?

Being killed, severely injured, traumatized, your livelihood completely destroyed.

12
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 03:23:36 AM »
Also I should note that he has already spent more than 18 months in jail even though he hasn't been tried yet, but that is the sentence he was facing in Cyprus anyways.

13
The Lounge / Re: I have very sad news. Rabinoz has passed away.
« on: August 03, 2020, 03:12:26 AM »
Wow, I didn't expect that... Fells very weird... Rest in peace, Rab.

14
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 03:08:05 AM »
The things that outage you and the things that don't sometimes surprises me. He stole a shitload of money. For years. And he got caught. The fact that what he did was illegal isn't some carefully guarded secret, and it's not as if he only stole what he needed to get by.

? Yes? Like, what's the point here exactly? Yeah I imagine if someone has the ability to either steal 10k or 90k and they have already decided to steal they're gonna steal 90k probably. It seems more weird to me that it doesn't outrage you that a minor was extradited and is facing 20 years in prison for non violent cyber crimes that were influenced by his family's and personal social and financial situation. Like, already being socially isolated (both due to mental illness, having to drop out of school and being half Filipino, Cyprus (and Greece) is pretty racist against Filipinos), AND in a nasty financial situation, is it that crazy that using his skills in computers to make easy money by cyber crime was appealing? No. Was he an adult when the crimes were committed? No. Did his actions gravely harm anyone? Well, he cost a bunch of money to some websites but that can be repaired, there were no violent crimes. With all said and done, does it make sense that he should be extradited to a completely foreign country, and in fact being the ONLY Cypriot citizen extradited together with some Hezbollah money launderer, and facing being locked up for a couple of decades? I really don't think so.

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You didn't give any indication of what the scale was. Or the insane amount of money he stole.

He tried to extort 90k out of them. My understanding is he didn't manage to steal all that, at least the articles imply he managed to defraud around 45k iirc, all said and done. And idk how much of that went to him or how much was shared with his partners. The rest wasn't stolen, it was dirty money he and his partners got paid by some other businesses.

As for the Aspergers thing, my understanding from reading what some psychiatrists who examined him said, is that it is bad enough that it poses a legitimate concern surrounding him being extradited to an entirely unfamiliar country. At least that's what said psychiatrists reported at the court.

15
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 03:02:20 AM »
Extradition should only occur at the moment of one's capture, to be tried by the law of the country he commited the crime in. Being judged, put in prison and after several years being judged again should not be possible. The only reason for extradition after all that would be if they found another crime the accused hadn't been on trial for before.
His trial wasn't over yet in Cyprus, but he was pre-jailed.

16
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 03:01:33 AM »
Also, my 2 cents on the Asperger's angle.  My brother has this condition.  It in no way impairs his ability to judge right from wrong.
That is not what I implied at any point.

17
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 03, 2020, 03:00:18 AM »
This guy committed the crime in Cyprus. It seems he already served jail for it.
Εh, not exactly, he was jailed for some time before the trial began but then they managed to pay bail, and he was let out of jail until the trial. Then he was arrested again to be extradited. He was going to face trial in his own country anyways and he already did plenty of time in prison, I don't understand why he should be extradited.

18
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Why are Hollywood movies so crap?
« on: August 01, 2020, 10:07:44 AM »
The kids were needed I guess to explain that machine parts dont last forever. Once they broke down there were zero replacements. Kids were apparently small enough to get in the bowels of the train to work the machinery.

Not sure we needed a lengthy explanation on the world freezing. The story begins decades after the catastrophe. I guess the explanation is an attempt to convey the perils of mankind experimenting with our own biosphere. Sometimes our attempts to fix something only ends up breaking it further

It's a movie so obviously some suspension of disbelief is required. Lets face it, no way a train could continue indefinitely without derailing with so much snow build up and zero maintenance to the track.

One thing I like about Korean movies is that it doesn't follow a Hollywood cookie-cutter plot. You dont know who lives or dies by the end. A lot of their movies I'm like 'I did not see that coming!' or they take a turn that my limited Hollywood movie conditioned brain would never have considered

If this were Hollywood written and directed, the characters of Chris Evans and Kang-ho Song would have lived.
I think that's what JJA is saying, we don't need an explanation and he would prefer it if even more was left unexplained so that there wasn't much left that didn't make sense.

Imo what is actually annoying is when movies break the rules they have set, or if they try to overexplain stuff that inherently doesn't make sense. I don't think Snowpiercer did either so it was fine for me.

I just couldn't really accept using children as machine parts.  I mean, I have a pretty good idea how locomotives work and there aren't a lot of parts you can replace with a 10 year old. :)
How many of them had a perpetual motion machine on board?  ;)

19
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 01, 2020, 10:05:51 AM »
He may have had a bad childhood.

I did.   I never went on a crime spree.

Do you realize how much effort he put into his crimes?
He did not "fuck up". He plotted and worked at his crimes for many years.
On purpose. Hundreds of hours of work for a specific purpose.


He robbed and stole and pilfered and extorted things he knew were not his.
Not a mistake. A goal.

He demonstrated an advanced knowledge of criminal behavior.
He knew right from wrong. Otherwise he would have done his shit in the open.


He is a menace to the entire planet.

LOL dude calm down, "a menace to the entire planet". Yeah, he's a kid with Aspergers who's good at computers and very short on money, so he found a way to make lots of money by cyber crimes. And really, to many people cyber crimes don't feel as bad or as "wrong". Like, it's one thing to steal a DVD, it feels like a completely different thing to pirate a movie-and I'm sure most people here have done it plenty of times. He should pay up and serve some small sentence. Then he can hopefully stop doing this sort of stuff, or he'll get busted again and actually get a serious sentence. I don't understand what the downside of that would be. But that is not what is happening, he is being extradited to a foreign country and threatened with 20 years in prison, which is frankly ridiculous. He didn't kill anyone, the most serious thing he did was extort a company for money, and they can just make him pay whatever he managed to take from them back.

20
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Cypriot hacker extradited to the US
« on: August 01, 2020, 09:54:39 AM »
You can see the "whole story" of what the hacks were here:
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.zdnet.com/google-amp/article/hacker-behind-ripoff-report-extortion-attempt-extradited-to-the-us/

A lot of these hacks are from 2017 - how many of these were from after he was 18 years old and in the eyes of the law, an adult?
None, because he was already arrested before he reached that age.

The hacks you mentioned were the ones I mentioned in the op. He hacked ROR to delete complaints for money, and he hacked Armor Games to extort money from them. Also he did a DDOS attack to some telecom company or something.

21
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Why are Hollywood movies so crap?
« on: July 31, 2020, 06:36:08 AM »
The kids were needed I guess to explain that machine parts dont last forever. Once they broke down there were zero replacements. Kids were apparently small enough to get in the bowels of the train to work the machinery.

Not sure we needed a lengthy explanation on the world freezing. The story begins decades after the catastrophe. I guess the explanation is an attempt to convey the perils of mankind experimenting with our own biosphere. Sometimes our attempts to fix something only ends up breaking it further

It's a movie so obviously some suspension of disbelief is required. Lets face it, no way a train could continue indefinitely without derailing with so much snow build up and zero maintenance to the track.

One thing I like about Korean movies is that it doesn't follow a Hollywood cookie-cutter plot. You dont know who lives or dies by the end. A lot of their movies I'm like 'I did not see that coming!' or they take a turn that my limited Hollywood movie conditioned brain would never have considered

If this were Hollywood written and directed, the characters of Chris Evans and Kang-ho Song would have lived.
I think that's what JJA is saying, we don't need an explanation and he would prefer it if even more was left unexplained so that there wasn't much left that didn't make sense.

Imo what is actually annoying is when movies break the rules they have set, or if they try to overexplain stuff that inherently doesn't make sense. I don't think Snowpiercer did either so it was fine for me.

22
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Why are Hollywood movies so crap?
« on: July 31, 2020, 02:15:30 AM »
Well, Snowpiercer didn't try to explain much. They just said "well at some point the world froze. Oh, also the train works on perpetual motion, somehow". But maybe it would have been better not to show why the kids were needed.

24
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Why are Hollywood movies so crap?
« on: July 30, 2020, 09:44:29 AM »
Korean movies I recently seen

Along with the Gods Parts 1 & 2 - Awesome movies! Fantasy, action, a little light hearted comedy and drama all in 1
The Thieves - Heist movie, lots of Korean A listers, long movie but lots of fun
The Pirates - Set in 1300s in the Joseon period, this is an action comedy that's a great popcorn flick.
Extreme Job - Police action/comedy that's full of laughs the whole movie through. Biggest box office take in Korean history apparently
Rampant - A zombie movie set in the Joseon period - a little slow but does have its moments. No zombie movie can compare with Train to Busan though!

I have plenty more in my collection to watch too 8)
Watch the Wailing if you haven't, I think I have recommended it again, it's a pretty crazy horror movie that combines many different genres of horror. It kinda hates the Japanese though for some reason.

Yep, it's arrived and waiting to watch! :) Just need a spare 3 hours later
Nice. Also I've watched Okja, it's a confusing movie. It looks like a kids movie and it has many scenes that point to that but at times it is extremely depressing and disturbing, I'd be 100% scarred if I watched it when I was little.

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Based on the very little bit I have seen here, I have a couple thoughts. One is that in general, if a 16 year old (or any minor) commits a crime and isn't put on trial for it until after their 18th birthday, they should not be exposed to any harsher penalties than they would have been subject to when they were a minor and actually committed the crime. Second is, this dude did a bad thing and definitely should see consequences for that. And obviously it wasn't a one-and-done thing, because he got busted for a DDoS attack too, and who even knows what else he got away with before he got caught on these things he's been held accountable for.

When you break the law, there are consequences. And when you do it internationally, even more so. But the consequences for the things he did as a 14-16 year old should be the consequences that would normally be issued to a 14-16 year old committing those crimes, not the consequences for an adult that did those crimes.

Thing is, he was already facing consequences for it in Cyprus, they shouldn't have extradited him to an entirely unfamiliar country.
I thought you said he was facing consequences for the DDoS, implying it wasn't for this other stuff. You said he was 18 in 2017 when he got arrested. That makes him 21 now. He shouldn't just finally be "facing consequences for it in Cyprus," this is 5-7 years after the fact.

They didn't know about the other hack before. His trial wasn't over yet, he had been arrested and jailed for some time before they managed to get him out on bail. Then FBI said they think he is guilty for hacking Armor Games and Ripoff Report, so they arrested him again and extradited him. It's actually the first extradition of a Cypriot citizen to the US and I believe it may have something to do with Cyprus trying to sweet talk the US because there's a lot of stuff going on between Turkey, Greece and Cyprus so I guess that may have something to do with this. But this is just speculation.

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They actually couldn't do that until recently, they changed their constitution. I understand extraditing some war criminal or major terrorist or whatever but this just seems lame.

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Based on the very little bit I have seen here, I have a couple thoughts. One is that in general, if a 16 year old (or any minor) commits a crime and isn't put on trial for it until after their 18th birthday, they should not be exposed to any harsher penalties than they would have been subject to when they were a minor and actually committed the crime. Second is, this dude did a bad thing and definitely should see consequences for that. And obviously it wasn't a one-and-done thing, because he got busted for a DDoS attack too, and who even knows what else he got away with before he got caught on these things he's been held accountable for.

When you break the law, there are consequences. And when you do it internationally, even more so. But the consequences for the things he did as a 14-16 year old should be the consequences that would normally be issued to a 14-16 year old committing those crimes, not the consequences for an adult that did those crimes.

Thing is, he was already facing consequences for it in Cyprus, they shouldn't have extradited him to an entirely unfamiliar country.

28

I know plenty of people with Aspergerís Syndrome and it in no way makes you a criminal.

I never said it makes you a criminal. I said it as one more thing that makes the situation of someone forced to drop out of highschool even harder.

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I doubt you would be very happy if your data was exposed by him and you lost money or had your identity stolen causing you years of headaches.  He committed serious crimes.

He didn't steal anyone's identity, he hacked the user bases and threatened to expose public information in exchange of money from Armor Games, and deleted negative reviews for businesses probably at the request of said businesses at Ripoff Report.

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Now, if it all happened when he was 14 then I don't agree with his extradition. But I have to imagine there is more to the story than what I can find online, it sounds like some of it was more recent.

It wasn't more recent as he was arrested in 2017, when he was 18 years old for actions he committed earlier (not the same ones he was extradited for, that one was a DDOS attack). He was released on bail but then the FBI requested his extradition because they suspected him for hacking Armor Games and Ripoff Report and I think a couple other sites.

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As for the skill it takes, not so much. You can do plenty of damage with scripts and tools found all over. Hacking into a specific site takes skill, running a fishing script to find holes is easy to do.

He did hack specific sites though.

If it was public data then he couldn't use it to blackmail. The article said data about customers, likely personal and financial information.

I doubt he decided he was going to go after Armor Games specifically.  He probably used a tool to scan sites for vulnerabilities and that's one he found. Probably others too, but he picked one with lots of sensitive data. We don't know the details, so it's all guesswork.

I feel bad for the kid, but it's not a victimless crime. All those customers at risk were real people.
He definitely hacked Ripoff Report specifically, because the whole point was that he was being paid to delete reviews there. As for the customers, I doubt they faced any serious issues, the data was probably emails, I mean, what else do you give Armor Games? I may have actually been one of the people exposed, I don't remember but I may have had an account there lol.

29

I know plenty of people with Aspergerís Syndrome and it in no way makes you a criminal.

I never said it makes you a criminal. I said it as one more thing that makes the situation of someone forced to drop out of highschool even harder.

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I doubt you would be very happy if your data was exposed by him and you lost money or had your identity stolen causing you years of headaches.  He committed serious crimes.

He didn't steal anyone's identity, he hacked the user bases and threatened to expose public information in exchange of money from Armor Games, and deleted negative reviews for businesses probably at the request of said businesses at Ripoff Report.

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Now, if it all happened when he was 14 then I don't agree with his extradition. But I have to imagine there is more to the story than what I can find online, it sounds like some of it was more recent.

It wasn't more recent as he was arrested in 2017, when he was 18 years old for actions he committed earlier (not the same ones he was extradited for, that one was a DDOS attack). He was released on bail but then the FBI requested his extradition because they suspected him for hacking Armor Games and Ripoff Report and I think a couple other sites.

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As for the skill it takes, not so much. You can do plenty of damage with scripts and tools found all over. Hacking into a specific site takes skill, running a fishing script to find holes is easy to do.

He did hack specific sites though.

30
Are you asking if bad behavior shouldn't be punished?
Do you not think already having spent time in jail along with all the trouble that comes with is enough punishment for a 16 year old hacker? Do you agree with the extradition and the potential 20 year sentence or is death sentence a more appropriate punishment?

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