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Messages - Yaakov ben Avraham

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1
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Does this only happen in Greece?
« on: April 12, 2017, 06:42:03 AM »
*CHUCKLING* That was funny.

2
Flat Earth General / Re: Abook I just found.
« on: April 10, 2017, 05:46:41 PM »
Why, thank you!

3
*GRIN*Until an, you misunderstand. His was one to which I had a direct response. That doesn't mean any of the others were less important. I think some of your calendrical proposals are quite interesting.

4
Flat Earth General / Abook I just found.
« on: April 09, 2017, 11:47:33 PM »
I have just located a book on my Kindle device, called "Is the Bible from Heaven? Is the Earth a Globe?" by Alex Gleason, written 1890 and updated 1893. Can anyone tell me about it?

5
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Weapons of Mass Deception.
« on: April 09, 2017, 11:41:57 PM »
I honestly think those WMD may have been moved to Syria on the sly. Geopolitics were MUCH different then as opposed to now.

6
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Does this only happen in Greece?
« on: April 09, 2017, 11:16:25 PM »
I am personally a member of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. This is one of the most conservative Lutheran Churches in the world. My wife is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, one of the most liberal in the world. I have a good friend who is Orthodox Church of America, which is basically the Russian Orthodox Church that became autonomous in the early 1970's.   

In Germany, they do require all young people to take a class in Catholic or Protestant Christianity. Its not so much for indoctrination as it is for information's sake, and the teachers are not permitted to bash on other churches. The three largest Church communities are Catholic, Lutheran, and Reformed, more or less. Its a bit more complicated than that, but that will suffice. Every citizen pays a 5% Church Tax, unless they formally belong to one of the Free Churches (say, the Mormons). That tax goes to the church of which they are a member. Even though Germany is quite secular, most people don't seem to mind the tax.   

Here in America, things are quite different. Religion is NOT taught in public schools. Taxes are NOT collected for the churches. The churches, however, operate without having to PAY tax. If a parent wants their child to receive a religious education, they can certainly send them to a private chool run by the church denomination of their choice. My own city has a Catholic school and a Lutheran school in it.   

Keep in mind that the USA does NOT have an official church. Greece DOES, namely, the Holy Orthodox Church of Greece, in which at least 97% of population are formally baptised, even if actual practice is less than that. VERY few Christian countries are quite that monochrome in their religious culture. It does not surprise me at ALL that your educational situation is what it is.   

Are there other countries like Greece? Yes, but not Christian ones, really. Saudi Arabia, and other Muslim States that follow Sharia Law are very MUCH like Greece in that respect, only worse. Israel has somewhat a similar approach,  but they account for the fact that 20% of the population is Arab, mostly Muslim, some Christian (largely Orthodox [either Eastern or Oriental], and some Catholic), and a small number of Druze). Ergo, in their schools, they tend to make sure that Jews are taught a bit about Judaism, Christians about Christianity, and Muslims about their beliefs. The Druze tend to live apart and take care of their own needs, although they DO willingly submit to the draft for army service. There IS an odd exception for devoutly religious Heredim, who are ultra-Orthodox Jews who live apart and only give their young a religious education after about the 8th grade. This is permitted by the Israeli State, although many of the REST of the Jews in Israel are starting to get damned mad at people they consider to be slackers. The fact that these Heredim refuse to serve in the military, which is required of all other Jews and Druze (2.5 years for men, 2 years for women), is also making people really mad.   

Perhaps that information is of some assistance to you. Happy Easter.

7
Gumby, I am not referring to the days of the Seven Day Week. You are of course correct on that. I am referring the habit of the Church of giving each individual day to a Saint, like the Feast of St. Michael and all Angels on 29 September, irrespective of the day of the week it lands on. The French Republican Calendar changed this by giving each day to a plant, animal, or farm tool, irrespective of the day of the decade that it was.

Interesting responses so far though. Please, continue!

8
Greetings. Long time no chat. But tonight I have an interesting topic to discuss, namely, calendars. Calendars are a fascinating subject. Ever since the dawn of human history, man has sought to keep track of time. Starting with the seconds, minutes, and hours of a day, to days, weeks, months, years, and centuries, man has tried to perfect his knowledge of just WHERE we were on the schedule of religious observances and agricultual cycles, as well as our own body's bio-rhythms (particularly in the case of the female of the species).   

The fact that we can calculate time according to either a lunar cycle or a solar cycle, or even a luni-solar cycle (as in the case of the Jews and several other cultures),  enables us to be very creative with the making of time measurement devices. It is well known that the Gregorian Calendar used by most Christians and by the majority of the world for secular purposes is a solar calendar. The Islamic Calendar is lunar.

Of course, the benefit of the solar calendars is that they can be used for agricultural purposes. The weakness is the issue of the Earth taking 365.242227 days to circle the Sun. The current system in use says that every four years is a leap year except century years unless that year is evenly divisible by 4. So 1600 WAS a leap year, 1700, 1800, and 1900 were NOT, but 2000 WAS.

Perhaps the most logical calendar ever devised was the French Revolutionary Calendar, also called the French Republican Calendar. Designed to eliminate all religious and royalist influence, it was also part of the overall metrication of France, along with Decimal Time and Decimal Weights and Measures. There were still twelve months in the year, but each month was 30 days long, and divided into 3 weeks of ten  days each, known aas decades. Each month was given a rather poetic name describing the weather or common activity during that month (for example, Vendemiaire, meaning Grape Harvest, or Nivose, meaning Snowy). The first three months rhymed with each other. The second batch of three did as well, and so-on through the  year.

The days of the decade were simply named primidi, duodi, tridi, quartidi, quintidi, sextidi, septidi, octidi, nonidi, and decadi. But EVERY day of the year was given the name of a plant, an animal, or an agricultural tool. This was a direct insult to the custom of the Church marking time by giving each day over to a Saint.

Year I (years were marked in Roman numerals) was adjudged to have started at Midnight on 22 September 1793, 1 Vendemiaire I. This was retroactive, as the calendar was not used until 24 November 1793.  Of course, it was obvious that this was a year of 360 days, so five more were added at the end of each year, to honour such thing as as Virtue, Labour, Genius, Honour, and Opinion. A leap year had another day dedicated to the Revolution itself.

Beacause the New Year began when the Autumnal Equinox was observed from Paris, this meant that things were a  bit inexact., particularly regarding leap years. Ultimately the decision was made to start mathematically regularising things as of 1820, but this never happened, as the calendar was no longer in use.   

There were various reasons for the demise of the calendar. One was that, although the people actually got MORE time off  (a full day on a decadi, and half a day on a quintidi) than they had under the old calendar (a full day on a Sunday), they still rather resented the ten day cycle, no matter how logical it may have been. It interfered not only with Church on Sunday, but other Christian festivals as well. Another problem was simply having to observe the beginning of the Autumnal Equinox. Furthermore, while the names of the months quite accurately described things in Northern France, they certainly would have been a bit odd in French Guiana or parts of Africa.

Granted, the Equinox could have been resolved by mathematics, and has been, by those with interest in the subject. The same applies to the leap year, wherein every fourth year is a leap year unless it can be evenly divided by 128.     

On an interesting side note, the French Calendar very closely reproduced the ancient Egyptian Calendar, except that their New Year began at the start of Summer.

I shall freely admit that I use the French Calendar in my personal scheduling and accounting, and in the memo line of my cheques, I always write the FRC date, and keep it in my cheque book along with the Gregorian date.

So, the question I have for all of you is the following:

Do you think we should change the calendar we currently use, and if so, why, and to which one?I shall be interested to read your responses.

9
The Lounge / Re: Greeting Again.
« on: November 28, 2016, 06:24:07 PM »
CHUCKLE***

I haven't been a Communist in years.Hey JROA. What's up?

10
The Lounge / Re: Greeting Again.
« on: November 28, 2016, 03:36:39 AM »
Oh, I recall. I was not a Flatter myself, but I was willing to consider the option at the VERY beginning of my residence here. You know, I would still be open to that, except there just isn't enough proof! But if someone showed me true proof... I would be willing to believe the Moon is made of green cheese and has Quakers living on it.

I realise that sounds funny. Its not intended to. The Mormon leader Joseph Smith taught that the Moon was populated by men who dressed like Quakers. It is a common child's myth that the Moon is made of green cheese. The point is that both ideas are commonly regarded as BS.

But I am open to ANY idea, of any pedigree, if it comes with evidence. I just haven't seen any that is convincing for the FE side. If anyone has any...




11
The Lounge / Re: Greeting Again.
« on: November 27, 2016, 03:44:49 PM »
What makes you think I was a flat earther? I was an Observant Religious Jew, but never an FEer.

12
The Lounge / Re: Greeting Again.
« on: November 27, 2016, 10:37:10 AM »
Even assuming I wanted to hack a site (which I do not) I haven't got the skill to do it!

13
The Lounge / Greeting Again.
« on: November 27, 2016, 04:42:53 AM »
Hello. Been a long time since I have been here, so I thought I would start over. First, some major changes in life. One, no computer. it doesn't work, so I am on my new Kindle or a tablet. My previous Kindle would not do this site, but this device will.

2, I have joined the Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod. There were profound spiritual reasons for that that I can discuss with ome of you privately.

3, I am glad too be back! Lets hop!

4, I notice you were hacked. NOT COOL, MAN!

14
Flat Earth General / Re: Flat earth & Religion
« on: August 12, 2016, 03:29:28 PM »
Good day Yaakov, well, I was sure you are a native Hebrew speaker. So the phrase is "How could you allow yourself to do it?". THe question mark is on right because I used right justification. wasn't sure if this forum allows right-to-left languages.

I honestly don't know if the forum permits it or not. I am a Jew ethnically, but my family was COMPLETELY non-Observant, so my experience has been heavily Christian, followed by Orthodox Judaism, and now Christianity. Its a long story.

Quote
So you did answer it anyway :) Well, I must admit, I'm a bit surprised. Me too passed through orthodox Judaism and now I'm a total agnostic. I don't have anything against any religion though. Well, maybe a bit against Islam for the known stuff...  But not more than that.

Let me ask, are you a FET believer?

I have quite a bit against Islam because it likes to blow crap up. But beyond them, I don't have issues with Religions. I am not FET believer, no. I believe in RET. But I don't deny, I find the theories endlessly fascinating.

15
Flat Earth General / Re: Flat earth & Religion
« on: August 12, 2016, 12:21:52 PM »
Is it possible for one without the other? I for one don't believe in any sort of god but it seems a lot of flat earth revolves around a god. Any other non religious believers?

There are so many threads about this subject already  >:(

Flat earthers are just as likely to be religious as any other group of people. There are more religious roundies posting on this forum than religious FEers.

That is probably true, now I think about it.

16
Flat Earth General / Re: Flat earth & Religion
« on: August 12, 2016, 09:39:09 AM »
I myself am a recent convert from Judaism to the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod.
איך הרשת לעצמך?

Ah, what? Why is the question mark at the right end of the sentence, when Hebrew reads from Right to Left? Now, I never really learned how to read Hebrew that well as a kid (a lot of American Jews have that problem), but I am not a total idiot. Remember, I was in a COMPLETELY non-Observant household. In fact, my first relationship with religion was with Catholic Christianity, both Roman and Anglican. I almost became a Priest and Monk.

Becoming a Lutheran is for very personal reasons. It follows a circle that completes one Eternal Round. I don't know that anyone will get it, and I know I don't mind whether they do or not. I was an Observant Jew for 11 years of my life. So I know more about the theology of the thing than I do the language of the thing.

But the question roughly translates as "How do you network yourself?" What does that even mean, anyway? I am not sure I get it.

17
I am further curious to know whether or not you are familiar with that text that is commonly known as "el Quijote Falso", by Alonso Fernández de Avellaneda. I actually have it in English Translation. I have not yet been able to read it. However, it was a Print-on-Demand book, and so it cost US$50.00 for a softbound text, which is ridiculous, but still worth every penny I paid for it, just to say I have it.

As far as translations go, I have the Edith Grossman in English in print, softbound. On my Nook, I have the Tobias Smollett revised by Carole Slade version. On Kindle, I have a Castilian version Don Quijote. Then I have a copy of the Complete Works of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra translated by John Ormsby. And I have a print copy of the Castilian Don Quijote softbound.

So you can say I have made quite a project out of Don Quixote and Miguel de Cervantes. I still need to read the False Quixote, but all in good time. Meanwhile, I am wondering what you might know about it.

18
So, GLARING EYE, is it safe to assume that you ARE from Spain? If so, from where?

19
Take this little poll for me. I included it in the section on PR&S, because AFTER you take the poll, there is more to it than that. I would like to see a discussion develop here about culture and ethical values in Spain during the 16th and 17th Centuries, what with the Expulsion of he Moors and the Jews at the end of the 15th Century, and the whole obsession with "Old Christians" v. "New Christians" in Spain at the time.

Ultimately ALL of this led up to Generalissimo Francisco Franco, who considered himself to be the last Crusader against both Communism and Islam, but also, to a point, against Judaism, although he did help out the Jews when push came to shove in WWII.

I can't help but see some parallels with Catholicism in 16th and 17th Centuries with ISIS/ISIL/IS of today.

Muslims have a LONG memory. These people think back to the Crusades. They remember Christian Armies sweeping across the Middle East, killing whatever got in the way.  And they still hold it against us (hence the killing of Christians in the Middle East today, and the explanation being that "they have killed some Crusaders").

Now I say things NOT to excuse ISIS/ISIL/IS. I hate the bastards and think we should go Dresden on them, and kill anything larger than a bunny rabbit over there. But that is not the point. The point is to try to figure out what made tem the way they are.

I believe they are what they are because they don't forget History the way Westerners do. They remember the Crusades, they remember the Exile of the Moors and of the Jews from Spain (1492), and they certainly remember those who stayed behind having to become Christians at risk of their lives, and even having done that, were STILL under risk, just because they were a New Christian and not an Old Christian.

I have read Don Quixote in English a few times. I am now slogging my way through the original Castilian, which is difficult, simply because (1), Literary Castilian is harder than Castilian as spoken on the streets, and (2), Castilian of any variety is harder than the Latin American Spanish I speak (although Costa Rican Spanish IS closer to Castilian than Mexican Spanish was). Don Quixote reflects, in a rather funny way, the culture of Spain as it was during the time that Cervantes wrote. Yet at the time it carries a certain serious undertone that cannot be challenged nor gainsaid.

I think Conker, given his place of birth and residence, would be able to give some of the best answers on this thread, and so I specifically invite him to come to enter the threat and comment at will. You are all welcome of course. But I thought I would invite him special since I know he has many strengths to bring to a conversation of this nature.

Peace.

20
Flat Earth General / Re: Flat earth & Religion
« on: August 11, 2016, 12:48:51 PM »
One would assume so, yes. But in this forum, I have encountered some FEer's that do appear to have degrees. Granted, that cannot be proven, but they do claim it, and some of them write like they do. Having obtained two BA's and one MA myself, and having taught University as well, I am able to often tell if a person is, or is likely to have been, University educated. Of course, I am not the Pope, and thus do not even CLAIM infallibility, so I could therefore be wrong in certain cases, but I think you see my point.

21
Flat Earth General / Re: Flat earth & Religion
« on: August 11, 2016, 08:25:00 AM »
Yes, it IS possible to be Atheistic or Agnostic and Flat Earth. I am none of the three, and think all such ideas are ridiculous. But I would suggest that the MAJORITY of the Flat Earthers here ARE Atheist or Agnostic.

Now to be fair: The founder of modern Flat Earthism, Samuel B. Rowbotham, aka Parallax, author of Earth Not a Globe, was a devout Christian and spends a good part of his book explaining just how the Bible should supposedly be interpreted to accept and justify Flat Earth ideas.

In fact I would say that the majority of PEOPLE on this site are Atheist/Agnostic, irrespective of their thoughts on their shape of the planet. The next highest list of people would be those identifying with Christianity, followed by Muslims, followed by Jews. I myself am a recent convert from Judaism to the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod.

In brief explanation of that, there are several different Lutheran Churches in the USA. The largest is the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). They are a "quatenus" Church, which means they subscribe to the Lutheran Confessions contained in the Book of Concord "insofar" as they agree with Scripture. Since they feel that way about the Confessions, they can pretty much do what they like, and that means that marrying two men or two women, ordaining lady clergy, or even partnered gay people, is A-OK.

The Missouri Synod is a "quia" Church. This means we subscribe to the Lutheran Confessions "because" they agree with Scripture. Which means our conduct must be restricted to that which the Confessions and the whole of Scripture dictate. So no weird stuff, like men marrying men, or girlie clergy, or homosexual clergy that are playing "hide the sausage" with their buddy, or anything like that.

There are many "quia" Churches. Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod is one (WELS), ELS is another (Evangelical Lutheran Synod), and several more. They all believe ESSENTIALLY the same thing. The separation into different Churches tends to be an ethnic thing more than anything else. For example, the ELS are a small Church made up mostly of a bunch of stiff lipped Norwegians in Minnesota. The Missouri Synod (far and away the largest "quia" Church) is largely German, as is WELS.

Now, the Confessional "quia" Churches have issues with ELCA, simply because in our minds, you can't simply think being gay is a good thing, and women at the altar is cool. So this IS a conservative/liberal thing.

There is one more Church that deserves mention. Lutheran Congregations for Missions in Christ, LCMC. They appear to be confessionalist as at least according to their website. They are a small Church that broke off from ELCA in about 2009 when in fact the decision was made to allow same-sex marriage and practicing gay clergy. The breakoff occurred right here in my own part of the country, so I saw it occur first hand. It was interesting. But they weren't quite as conservative as LCMS or other Confessionalist Churches, insofar as they do have lady clergy. They have left that choice or not up to the congregation.

So there you are. Hope all that helps. And the explanation of Lutheranism wasn't just for our new reader. It was for our old readers just as much, who will read this text, and wonder about a Jew becoming Christian. That will answer at least a few doctrinal questions.

22
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Veganism
« on: August 11, 2016, 07:30:19 AM »
Interesting exegesis of the problem, John. Thanks.

23
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Veganism
« on: August 09, 2016, 11:38:42 AM »
Quote
What's the probability that such complicated systems aren't Turing-complete? I think that the burden of proof is definitely on one who claims that animal brains aren't Turing-complete.
That doesn't make a lot of sense. Think of it this way: HTML is very complicated, yet it isn't Turing-complete. Besides, neonatal brain has nearly as many neurons as does a brain of an adult. That probably has more to do with the number of synapses than the number of neurons. The rest of your argument seems legit, though.
Quote
Well, no, you won't, since you lost the argument, I guess there would be no point.
How did he lost the argument? It seems to me that you just ran away.

Not in the slightest. I grew too busy in my family life for an idiot.

24
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Veganism
« on: August 09, 2016, 08:47:18 AM »
Well, no, you won't, since you lost the argument, I guess there would be no point.

25
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Noah's Ark Encounter in Kentucky
« on: August 01, 2016, 08:23:38 PM »
I certainly don't believe the Earth is only 6,000 years old, and I don't believe that a human child ever safely played with a Tyrannosaur. So... where is everybody with this?

You appear to believe Tyrannosaurus and humans coexisted. Can you confirm that?

I'm with JD, this is a cool roadside attraction, but that's it and I would not really want to give any sort of support to someone as intellectually dishonest as Ken Ham.

Clarification:

I do not believe that dinosaurs and humans ever co-existed. I believe that since the Sun, the Moon, and the Stars were not created until the Fourth Day, the First Three days could have been of any length. The Light that shown on the Earth was that light reflected from the Glory of the Throne of God. YOU CAN'T HAVE A 24 HOUR DAY WITHOUT THE SUN!  So those "days" could have been millions of years. The Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Days were 24 hours long, yes. But beyond that... And the dinosaurs probably existed during the first Three days. However the Earth was lit.

That is ONE explanation. Another explanation is simply that God decides the length of any and all those days. Ergo, humans and Dinosaurs don't coexist.

Whatever the truth of the matter is, Dinosaurs and Humans DID NOT coexist. To say they did is just tomfoolery.

26
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Choose your fav government type
« on: July 30, 2016, 04:08:38 AM »
A Roman Republic.

27
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Veganism
« on: July 29, 2016, 02:13:02 PM »
Quote
In fact, you should be taken out and shot for the benefit of the planet, as you are a waste of the natural resources that it takes to sustain your existence.
And, at the same time, we should breed more cows, more chickens, more pigs...

The animals serve a purpose of being food. You serve no purpose.

28
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Veganism
« on: July 29, 2016, 02:02:47 PM »
If you think a cow knows its going to be dinner tomorrow night, then you are as stupid as said cow. I suggest that you have a situation of CITATION NEEDED.
Citation about what? Moravec's paradox? Well, search it in your preferred sources. And why should you be trusted about what's a valid source? You are one who believes that Israeli mythology about Exodus is true, because you take your culture over science. You are also one who believes in agenda that alcohol is healthy. You are one who believes that there is a massive conspiracy which has been hiding for decades that there was a holocaust in Croatia when it got independent. Your way of exploring the reality is so unreliable that by your 42nd year you still believe what most of the people know is nonsense and why it's nonsense. Though this forum seems to be a bit biased sample.

No, Shit for Brains. A citation that a cow knows that its dinner tomorrow.
Show me the citation that victims of cannibalism know they are dinner the next day.

Usually being tied up and seasoned and otherwise prepared for cooking is an indicator. A cow doesn't even know she is about to be shot. You are a fucking idiot. A teenage retarded fuck. You don't deserve to live. In fact, you should be taken out and shot for the benefit of the planet, as you are a waste of the natural resources that it takes to sustain your existence.

29
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Veganism
« on: July 29, 2016, 01:49:53 PM »
If you think a cow knows its going to be dinner tomorrow night, then you are as stupid as said cow. I suggest that you have a situation of CITATION NEEDED.
Citation about what? Moravec's paradox? Well, search it in your preferred sources. And why should you be trusted about what's a valid source? You are one who believes that Israeli mythology about Exodus is true, because you take your culture over science. You are also one who believes in agenda that alcohol is healthy. You are one who believes that there is a massive conspiracy which has been hiding for decades that there was a holocaust in Croatia when it got independent. Your way of exploring the reality is so unreliable that by your 42nd year you still believe what most of the people know is nonsense and why it's nonsense. Though this forum seems to be a bit biased sample.

No, Shit for Brains. A citation that a cow knows that its dinner tomorrow.

30
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Veganism
« on: July 29, 2016, 01:14:56 PM »
If you think a cow knows its going to be dinner tomorrow night, then you are as stupid as said cow. I suggest that you have a situation of CITATION NEEDED.

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