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Messages - FlatAssembler

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1
What are some songs that have changed their meaning completely over time? Like the Croatian song "Vilo Velebita", the title meant "beautiful tall woman" in the 17th century Croatian, but it has been reinterpreted to mean "fairy of the Velebit mountain" and is now one of the most famous Croatian patriotic songs (even though it originally wasn't patriotic at all).

2
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 14, 2020, 12:21:11 AM »
Sure. But knowing how computers work is a huge advantage when it comes to investing into virtual things, right?
No more than a knowledge of inorganic chemistry would help you invest in gold. Bitcoin is a vehicle for speculation and to a degree a store of value, like gold.   The price goes up, the price goes down.  Place your bets.
You don't need to know a significant part of organic chemistry to successfully trade with gold or silver, but you need to have some idea about how gold or silver is mined. If, hypothetically, there comes some new technology that enables much more efficient gold or silver mining, better sell all the gold or silver you have, because the price of gold or silver will drop significantly. New silver mining technologies in the 3rd century probably played a large part in the economic collapse of the Roman empire. And new gold mining technologies led to the economic collapse of the 14th century. Investing in gold is, quite literally, betting that there won't be a significant improvement in gold mining technologies soon. That doesn't sound like a very good idea, does it?
Though Bitcoin does not suffer much from the problem of inflation (there can only be 21'000'000 of them), it does suffer from a very similar problem: it promises anonymity to its users, but that can only be achieved if there doesn't come some technology which enables the bad guys to de-anonymize Bitcoin users. And betting on that sounds like an even worse idea, doesn't it?

So because you know how gold is mined, the guys inventing a new technology will immediately email you afterwards so you can sell your stock in time?
Yeah, sure, kiddo  ;)
No, but if you are aware of the current gold mining technologies, you can predict the next major breakthrough in it.

3
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 14, 2020, 12:19:40 AM »
Sure. But knowing how computers work is a huge advantage when it comes to investing into virtual things, right?
No more than a knowledge of inorganic chemistry would help you invest in gold. Bitcoin is a vehicle for speculation and to a degree a store of value, like gold.   The price goes up, the price goes down.  Place your bets.
You don't need to know a significant part of organic chemistry to successfully trade with gold or silver, but you need to have some idea about how gold or silver is mined. If, hypothetically, there comes some new technology that enables much more efficient gold or silver mining, better sell all the gold or silver you have, because the price of gold or silver will drop significantly. New silver mining technologies in the 3rd century probably played a large part in the economic collapse of the Roman empire. And new gold mining technologies led to the economic collapse of the 14th century. Investing in gold is, quite literally, betting that there won't be a significant improvement in gold mining technologies soon. That doesn't sound like a very good idea, does it?
Though Bitcoin does not suffer much from the problem of inflation (there can only be 21'000'000 of them), it does suffer from a very similar problem: it promises anonymity to its users, but that can only be achieved if there doesn't come some technology which enables the bad guys to de-anonymize Bitcoin users. And betting on that sounds like an even worse idea, doesn't it?

Anonymity is not the crux of alternative currency like bitcoin. Simple supply and demand is.
What does "crux" mean? As far as I know, that's the Latin word for "cross", so what you are saying makes no sense.

4
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 13, 2020, 07:23:04 PM »
Sure. But knowing how computers work is a huge advantage when it comes to investing into virtual things, right?
No more than a knowledge of inorganic chemistry would help you invest in gold. Bitcoin is a vehicle for speculation and to a degree a store of value, like gold.   The price goes up, the price goes down.  Place your bets.
You don't need to know a significant part of organic chemistry to successfully trade with gold or silver, but you need to have some idea about how gold or silver is mined. If, hypothetically, there comes some new technology that enables much more efficient gold or silver mining, better sell all the gold or silver you have, because the price of gold or silver will drop significantly. New silver mining technologies in the 3rd century probably played a large part in the economic collapse of the Roman empire. And new gold mining technologies led to the economic collapse of the 14th century. Investing in gold is, quite literally, betting that there won't be a significant improvement in gold mining technologies soon. That doesn't sound like a very good idea, does it?
Though Bitcoin does not suffer much from the problem of inflation (there can only be 21'000'000 of them), it does suffer from a very similar problem: it promises anonymity to its users, but that can only be achieved if there doesn't come some technology which enables the bad guys to de-anonymize Bitcoin users. And betting on that sounds like an even worse idea, doesn't it?

5
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 13, 2020, 10:51:34 AM »
It's just gambling.  Might as well bet on coin tosses.
It's gambling if you have no idea, like the prof.
And you somehow know better than a university professor who has published papers about Bitcoin mining hardware?
Mining hardware is electrical engineering. Sure the prof knows a lot about that.

But knowing and predicting markets has absolutely nothing to do with this. Why are you people not able to understand that?
Why would mining hardware be electrical engineering? It has more to do with electronic engineering, but even more so about informatics, cryptography and economics. To understand and predict modern markets, especially cryptocurrency markets, you need to have some understanding of those things. To understand how CloudFlare and DigiCert make money, you need to have some understanding of how computers work.
You have absolutely no idea about minining hardware, maybe even less than about trading (in case it is possible).
As far as I understand it, Bitcoin mining hardware is similar to graphics cards. But, like I've said, it's not worth looking into it as a way of making money when I know my computer architecture professor lost a lot of money on it. If my professor lost money on that, so will probably you and me.

Being a computer architecture professor doesn't necessarily make for being a savvy investor.
Sure. But knowing how computers work is a huge advantage when it comes to investing into virtual things, right?

6
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 13, 2020, 05:00:16 AM »
It's just gambling.  Might as well bet on coin tosses.
It's gambling if you have no idea, like the prof.
And you somehow know better than a university professor who has published papers about Bitcoin mining hardware?
Mining hardware is electrical engineering. Sure the prof knows a lot about that.

But knowing and predicting markets has absolutely nothing to do with this. Why are you people not able to understand that?
Why would mining hardware be electrical engineering? It has more to do with electronic engineering, but even more so about informatics, cryptography and economics. To understand and predict modern markets, especially cryptocurrency markets, you need to have some understanding of those things. To understand how CloudFlare and DigiCert make money, you need to have some understanding of how computers work.
You have absolutely no idea about minining hardware, maybe even less than about trading (in case it is possible).
As far as I understand it, Bitcoin mining hardware is similar to graphics cards. But, like I've said, it's not worth looking into it as a way of making money when I know my computer architecture professor lost a lot of money on it. If my professor lost money on that, so will probably you and me.

7
I tried briefly to make my own programming language in basic on my C64. It came with a desktop-style CLI I was also programming on it.

It was fun. I programmed all kinds of programs it would load if you for example typed "Calculator" or "School math program"

This was like 10 years ago, fun times.
What's C64? Never heard of it, to be honest. Can you share some example programs?

What's C64?

Way to make me feel old, dude.
Is C64 something similar to what PicoBlaze is now? I've made a PicoBlaze Simulator in JavaScript as a part of a university project.

8
Hi, how does AutoTrade picks its trades?

Does it pick the most profitable one from a list it scanned trades?

Does it pick up the first trade it finds?

Does it pick the trade with the biggest volume?

...

What does that have to do with anything?

By the way, the page you linked to isn't working, I get Error 403.
Don't you know a spambot when you see one?
If it is a spambot, how did it pass the CAPTCHA?
How can you claim to be a developer and you let something as obvious as that fool you? In fact, the very question you asked in this post that I'm replying to is also a weird thing for a developer to ask. AND YOU CLICKED THE LINK??????????
Well, whether I am a developer depends on what you mean by developer. I am not making money by programming (though I hope to be soon), but I do write pieces of software. "FlatAssembler" here and "FlatAssembler" on GitHub are the same person, here is a link to a thread about my programming language on this forum on GitHub. Why is my question weird. I myself often have trouble passing the CAPTCHAs that this website poses to me, and I am having trouble believing a bot can do that. What's wrong with clicking the link in a modern browser?

9
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: PicoBlaze Simulator in JavaScript
« on: November 10, 2020, 11:30:15 PM »
I believe that the Bible is a source of spiritual truth, not scientific truth.
I am quite sure it's not a source of spiritual truth either. Ask yourself, if Jesus was alive in the 20th century, wouldn't he support Communism? I think he would. In the Bible, he despised private property (he said poppies and birds live a lot better than humans because they don't care about private property), he said that taxation was ethical (that coins with emperor's image rightfully belong to the emperor), that rich will naturally become richer and poor poorer and that violent rebellion was a solution to the world's problems. Doesn't that sound like preaching Communism in the language of the 1st century?

10
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 10, 2020, 11:31:03 AM »
It's just gambling.  Might as well bet on coin tosses.
It's gambling if you have no idea, like the prof.
And you somehow know better than a university professor who has published papers about Bitcoin mining hardware?
Mining hardware is electrical engineering. Sure the prof knows a lot about that.

But knowing and predicting markets has absolutely nothing to do with this. Why are you people not able to understand that?
Why would mining hardware be electrical engineering? It has more to do with electronic engineering, but even more so about informatics, cryptography and economics. To understand and predict modern markets, especially cryptocurrency markets, you need to have some understanding of those things. To understand how CloudFlare and DigiCert make money, you need to have some understanding of how computers work.

11
Hi, how does AutoTrade picks its trades?

Does it pick the most profitable one from a list it scanned trades?

Does it pick up the first trade it finds?

Does it pick the trade with the biggest volume?

...

What does that have to do with anything?

By the way, the page you linked to isn't working, I get Error 403.
Don't you know a spambot when you see one?
If it is a spambot, how did it pass the CAPTCHA?

12
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 10, 2020, 10:31:03 AM »
It's just gambling.  Might as well bet on coin tosses.
It's gambling if you have no idea, like the prof.
And you somehow know better than a university professor who has published papers about Bitcoin mining hardware?

13
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 10, 2020, 08:04:23 AM »
Quote from: Definitely Not Swedish
Just wait until you find out that the btc blockchain is, in fact, public and everyone can take a look at it
I know what blockchain is, of course. It's supposed to prevent the attack on Bitcoin by using the same Bitcoin hash in more than one transaction, without compromising the anonymity. Unfortunately, as it turns out, the government computers can indeed use the data from blockchain to de-anonymize the users.
Quote from: Definitely Not Swedish
Me making money with btc while your prof is losing it literally proves that I am
No, it doesn't. It can be that you just got lucky now and will soon lose even more money.
Quote from: Definitely Not Swedish
Also he hasn't actually studied btc; Electr. Eng. is SOOOOOOOOO far from studying btc that I don't even want to start explaining it to you.
He is not an electrical engineering professor, he is a computer architecture professor. And he has published papers about the Bitcoin mining hardware. Electrical engineering is not the only course electrical engineers need to pass at the university, for God's sake.

14
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 09, 2020, 03:05:40 AM »
My professor almost certainly understands economics way more than you do. But, since you are a Flat-Earther, you are probably too arrogant to see that.
"I have no idea about anything, neither has my prof, thus I make up stuff to insult others so nobody notices my lack of knowledge"
-you
What do you mean I have no idea about anything? I am studying electrical engineering. And, yes, we were taught something about Bitcoin, in our Operating Systems classes.
You sound like a vegan. We go thst you study EE when you mentioned it the first three times.
And what I means is exactely what I said.
While I am mostly vegan, I fail to see what does that have to do with anything here. The fact is that it is arrogant of you to think you can do better at cryptocurrency than a university professor who has actually studied it. And I have a reason to think the price of Bitcoin will drop significantly over time: Bitcoin is based, on the large part, on the false promise of anonymity. The anonymity techniques it implements aren't nearly as strong as TOR is, and we have very good reasons to think the American government  can already trace what you are doing with Bitcoin. After a few years, it will probably be possible for anybody to trace what somebody else is doing with Bitcoin, and the premise on which Bitcoin is based will be obviously wrong, so its value will drop significantly.

15
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 08, 2020, 09:25:14 PM »
My professor almost certainly understands economics way more than you do. But, since you are a Flat-Earther, you are probably too arrogant to see that.
"I have no idea about anything, neither has my prof, thus I make up stuff to insult others so nobody notices my lack of knowledge"
-you
What do you mean I have no idea about anything? I am studying electrical engineering. And, yes, we were taught something about Bitcoin, in our Operating Systems classes.

16
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 08, 2020, 08:28:45 AM »
Hello everyone,

As you all know, I'm quite rich but still could use some money.

Do any of you own bitcoin? Or trade with bitcoin? Are you successful with it? Any tips?
I wouldn't recommend it. To gain money via Bitcoin, you need to have a lot of knowledge of how they work. I am studying electrical engineering, and one of my professors told me personally they lost money on bitcoin. If a professor who is teaching computer science at the university cannot do it, who can? Very few people.
I can, apparently.
Being a prof in electrical engineering helps you basically 0 when it comes to bitcoin. BTC trading requires understanding of global events, reading news, being able to comprehend trading patterns and trends etc. Bitcoin is just a platform for trading/speculating; it hardly matters what the underlying mechanics of it are.


When it comes to trading, I'd own your prof no matter the platform it's based on.
My professor almost certainly understands economics way more than you do. But, since you are a Flat-Earther, you are probably too arrogant to see that.

17
Technology, Science & Alt Science / Re: SHOULD I BUY BITCOINS?
« on: November 08, 2020, 06:03:57 AM »
Hello everyone,

As you all know, I'm quite rich but still could use some money.

Do any of you own bitcoin? Or trade with bitcoin? Are you successful with it? Any tips?
I wouldn't recommend it. To gain money via Bitcoin, you need to have a lot of knowledge of how they work. I am studying electrical engineering, and one of my professors told me personally they lost money on bitcoin. If a professor who is teaching computer science at the university cannot do it, who can? Very few people.

18
Technology, Science & Alt Science / PicoBlaze Simulator in JavaScript
« on: November 08, 2020, 06:01:14 AM »
As a part of a school project, I've been developing my PicoBlaze Simulator in JavaScript. What do you think about it? How can I make it better in a way that isn't too difficult to program?

19
A thing I recently learned and that shocked me a bit is that Latin dative was never used to mean the direction of movement, that "Romani ite domui." not only sounded weird (as I thought before), but was incorrect. The direction of movement was always the accusative, as in "Romani ite domum.". I have always thought what's an adverbial phrase and what's an object was some kind of a linguistic universal. In Croatian, you would say "Neka Rimljani idu kući." ("kući" being the dative), and "kući" is considered to be an adverbial phrase, rather than an object. It turns out, what's an adverbial phrase in Croatian not only can be, but also must be, an object in Latin.

20
Yesterday evening, I've published a video in which I try to explain the basic concepts of the compiler theory:
What do you think about it?
Also, what do you think, does studying compiler theory help with programming in general? If you asked me this a year ago, I would say it certainly does. Now I am not so sure. I see that many people, most of which haven't studied the compiler theory, learn programming a lot faster than I do. I sometimes ask myself if it is because I've studied some compiler theory, rather than in spite of it. When trying to learn a programming language (such as MatLab or VHDL), I often find myself thinking "Wait, that seems impossible. How can that possibly be implemented in the compiler? I must have misunderstood something.", only to find that I didn't misunderstand it, and that the compiler somehow manages to compile that (even though I have no idea how I'd implement something like that in my compiler). Maybe I waste a lot of time on that and maybe I somehow need to turn off that kind of thinking in order to be a good programmer?
For example, I recently tried to learn some ReactJS and, of course, some advanced JavaScript. I thought it would be relatively easy, because I already knew some JavaScript, I've made a PacMan in JavaScript and a compiler for my language targeting x86 in JavaScript. But it wasn't easy for me. Soon after starting learning ReactJS, I bumped into something like this:
Code: [Select]
const header=<h1>Hello world!</h1>;I thought "Aha, that's some new syntax in JavaScript.". So I tried typing that into NodeJS, only to get a bunch of syntax errors. So I was thinking "What? If JavaScript engines can't parse the code when the ReactJS framework is not included, how can they possibly parse it when it is included? A framework can't possibly modify how the parser behaves, it starts executing only after the parsing phase has long passed. I don't get it.". Then came some importing CSS into JavaScript. I thought "What? How can that possibly work? JavaScript engines don't know anything about CSS. If you include a CSS file in JavaScript, it won't even tokenize (an identifier can't contain a '#' in JavaScript, but it can do so in CSS), yet alone parse and semantically analyze. I don't get it.". Then I saw the syntax for declaring properties of classes in JavaScript. In the example I saw, the declarations are separated with nothing but a new-line character. I thought: "What? But JavaScript is not a whitespace-sensitive language. How could this possibly work? How can the parser know where one declaration ends and where another declaration starts if they are not separated by a semicolon or a comma?". I thought it was too much for me, so I gave up.
So, maybe thinking about compiler theory is a very wrong way to think about the programming language you are studying. I was wondering what you thought about it.

21
Quote from: Shifter
It's bad in terms of culture and identity that can be lost along with it
And why are cultures worth preserving?
Quote from: Shifter
Some cultures dont even have words for time (eg seconds, minutes or even yesterday and tomorrow).
As far as I understand it, those "timeless" languages simply have different grammatical constructions to convey the same meaning.
Quote from: Shifter
Who is to say that English is the best and that we should adopt it as the universal language and that other countries should just dump their in favour for it?
English isn't perfect, but it's better to have some language as a universal language than to have no universal language. Esperanto or Lojban would, of course, be better, but it's even harder, politically, to make them a universal language.

22
That facts it's so hard to learn one that I have yet to really be able to converse in anything but English.
Well, as a Croatian, I needed to put a lot of effort to learn English. So, what do you think, is it a good thing that there are so many languages around the world? I think it isn't. Obviously, a lot of time and resources are spent in language learning and translations, and that damages the economies. And I fail to see how having different languages can make things better.

On a purely technical and efficiency level, having one language is clearly the best way to go.  No advantage to having half the planet unable to talk to the other half.  Plenty of disadvantages, plenty of misunderstandings.

However, it's just not going to happen because people will continue to be people.

We would be far better off if we stopped having wars, but that's not going to happen either.

Humans just are not rational, especially in big groups.
Linguists predict more than 50% of languages that are alive today will die in the next 100 years. Most linguists consider it a bad thing, but I think it's a good thing. And a sign that people are rational.

23
That facts it's so hard to learn one that I have yet to really be able to converse in anything but English.
Well, as a Croatian, I needed to put a lot of effort to learn English. So, what do you think, is it a good thing that there are so many languages around the world? I think it isn't. Obviously, a lot of time and resources are spent in language learning and translations, and that damages the economies. And I fail to see how having different languages can make things better.

24
To my knowledge other languages have more gender based words than English. Thatís something.
As far as I know, it's exactly the opposite. Languages which have different words for "he" and "she" are relatively rare. Finnish and Hungarian don't have different words for "he" and "she", and neither does Armenian or Persian (which are related to English).

French and Norwegian bokmŚl both have words for he and she. French has masculine and feminine words. From a quick search la France vs le Canada. Itís been a long time since I was in French class.
French and Norwegian are both related and a part of the same sprachbund. Most of the languages around the world don't even have a different word for "he" and "she", and languages having genders for inanimate nouns are very rare.

25
To my knowledge other languages have more gender based words than English. Thatís something.
As far as I know, it's exactly the opposite. Languages which have different words for "he" and "she" are relatively rare. Finnish and Hungarian don't have different words for "he" and "she", and neither does Armenian or Persian (which are related to English).

27
Chapeau, hat
Oeuf, egg
Those French have a different word for everything.
Why would you expect French (or any other language, for that matter) to have the same word for "hat" and "egg"?

28
How many words sound english .
In which language?

29
I don't really know any other languages than English all that well but sometimes I study them.

The romance languages have gendered nouns for things which clearly don't have a gender.  The hell is that all about?
I think the explanation most linguists will give you for the existence of genders is that they reduce ambiguity. If all things are referred to as "it", then it is supposedly easier to accidentally make an ambiguous sentence when referring to two things. I am not aware of any studies confirming that, however. Obviously, sometimes genders even create ambiguity, as Plautus wrote about in his comedy Aulularia (in one scene, one person is talking about a woman, and the other person is talking about a pot with gold, but since both a woman, "femina", and a pot, "aulularia", are an "ea", "she", in Latin, they don't realize they talk about different things).

30
So, I am interested, what are some things about languages that surprised you the most when learning another language? My native language is Croatian and I got very surprised to learn about the sequences of tenses. Before that, I used to think the rules for tenses in complex sentences in Croatian follow from the laws of logic. And, as it turns out, they are actually arbitrary complicated rules that vary between languages that have tenses, even among related languages.

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