The Flat Earth Society

Flat Earth Discussion Boards => Flat Earth General => Topic started by: wise on April 02, 2019, 12:07:42 PM

Title: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: wise on April 02, 2019, 12:07:42 PM
As we very well know that, so we can see sun during 24 hours if we on a high mountain. In this video you'll see sun at the night sky.

As all smart people very well know that sun shines and creates shadows, but it produces about 1/6 of daylight. It may be 1/5 to 1/10. So that it has a weak light. Without daylight it can not lighten all the sky, but can do it a part of it.

IMAGES:

(https://i.resimyukle.xyz/GAbAU8.png)
You can clearly see the stars behind the sun. Because it is night, so that light of the sun is not enough to close the stars.

(https://i.resimyukle.xyz/eczR8V.png)
Another example.

(https://i.resimyukle.xyz/P00ea1.png)
You see how sun is weak.

VIDEO:

Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: turtles on April 02, 2019, 01:26:59 PM
Why are you talking about the sun but posted three over-exposed photos of the moon?
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: wise on April 02, 2019, 01:33:47 PM
Why are you talking about the sun but posted three over-exposed photos of the moon?

It is sun. Moon does not shine like it.
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: turtles on April 02, 2019, 01:46:12 PM
Why are you talking about the sun but posted three over-exposed photos of the moon?

It is sun. Moon does not shine like it.

It does if you overexpose the pictures.
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: rabinoz on April 02, 2019, 02:33:49 PM
As we very well know that, so we can see sun during 24 hours if we on a high mountain. In this video you'll see sun at the night sky.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VIDEO:


No, we cannot see the sun during 24 hours if we on a high mountain unless that high mountain is far enough north or south and the date is close enough to mid-summer.

I have no similar photos that show the sun or moon, but I did take this photo:
(https://www.dropbox.com/s/9oz9rcberrc7yuf/Full%20Moon%20Photo%20-%20WA2-0624-083F.jpg?dl=1)
Karijini National Park: Exposure: 2.0 sec at f/2.8

There is no 24 hour sun showing in your video!

PS Yes, those little bright dots in the Karijini National Park photo are stars :)!
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: Xphilll on April 02, 2019, 02:36:28 PM
Thank you wise for getting back in the conversation, You are one of the most valuable people on this forum.
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: wise on April 02, 2019, 11:14:59 PM
Why are you talking about the sun but posted three over-exposed photos of the moon?

It is sun. Moon does not shine like it.

It does if you overexpose the pictures.

If you watch the video so you'll see that pictures have been taken from video. It is original and not posed.
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: wise on April 02, 2019, 11:15:56 PM
Thank you wise for getting back in the conversation, You are one of the most valuable people on this forum.

Another alt of John?

This is to John: John, give up to take alt accounts. Instead, close the alt account of NSS, give up to be turd anymore.
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: rabinoz on April 02, 2019, 11:27:07 PM
Why are you talking about the sun but posted three over-exposed photos of the moon?

It is sun. Moon does not shine like it.

It does if you overexpose the pictures.

If you watch the video so you'll see that pictures have been taken from video. It is original and not posed.
But the videos do not show the sun shining at night.
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: wise on April 02, 2019, 11:41:15 PM
Another image from same video. We see how the sun is shining in the night.

(https://i.resimyukle.xyz/P4aP8c.png)

This is another image captured by following video:

(https://i.resimyukle.xyz/BQ8zyy.png)

If you don't see the sun for the first time, you know it's the sun. clearly the sun is rising, but the night does not change.

Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: Smoke Machine on April 03, 2019, 02:35:21 AM
Wise, thanks for the link, I enjoyed those little videos! Stunning!

Umm, you may be mistaking the full moon in some of those photos? Especially if it was taken two weeks ago when the full moon was a super moon. The full moon can cast a lot of light at night.
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: jimster on April 03, 2019, 03:10:39 PM
This is all useless conversation. These can be photoshopped, as all pictures can. If NASA pics don't prove RE, by the same principle, pics don't prove FE.

Pics don't prove anything on FES! Why does anyone even post them?
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: FlatOrange on April 03, 2019, 03:44:04 PM
As we very well know that, so we can see sun during 24 hours if we on a high mountain.
Nowhere on Earth is this possible.

Not 1 mountain is tall enough for 24 hour daylight.

The tallest mountains experience the same amount of daylight/nighttime as the deepest valleys.

In fact, ALL parts of Earth experience equal amounts of daylight/nighttime*.

Altitude/height/elevation make absolutely no difference in amount of daylight/nighttime. The only difference is a tall mountain would see the sunrise earlier, but it would also set later. Meaning amount of daylight is equal to surrounding base of mountain.

I want to just keep reiterating this over and over. All parts of Earth have equal parts night and day when you add it all up.

You want to know why??? It's a spinning sphere.


*don't try to get me on a mariana trench technicality or ss like that.
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: sokarul on April 03, 2019, 04:03:08 PM
This isn’t the first time fe’ers have tried to pass the moon off as the sun.
Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: Alpha2Omega on April 03, 2019, 04:33:38 PM
As we very well know that, so we can see sun during 24 hours if we on a high mountain. In this video you'll see sun at the night sky.

That's a nice time lapse of moonlight. Each frame is a long-exposure photograph - probably several seconds - so moonlight appears as bright as sunlight with much shorter exposure. Even if it weren't obvious to you that it's a time lapse, the description on youtube says it is.

Quote from: Keming Zhang introducing youtube video LklAvQkj84E
Keming Zhang
Published on Jul 20, 2016
This time-lapse of the starry night skies is produced in Nepal, Lithuania, Malaysia, and China. Original production of Keming Zhang. All right Reserved.

The sun isn't up at night. That's what makes it night. The moon sometimes is.

Quote
As all smart people very well know that sun shines and creates shadows, but it produces about 1/6 of daylight.

Um, no.

Quote
(https://i.resimyukle.xyz/GAbAU8.png)
You can clearly see the stars behind the sun moon. Because it is night, so that light of the sun moon is not enough to close the stars.

(https://i.resimyukle.xyz/eczR8V.png)
Another example.

(https://i.resimyukle.xyz/P00ea1.png)
You see how sun moon is weak.

Corrected.

The phase of the moon in the last of those is much thinner than the other two. Notice how much brighter the stars are compared to the sky in that one.

Quote
VIDEO:


Title: Re: 24 hours sun in Everest
Post by: Canary on April 20, 2019, 02:29:01 AM
up