The Flat Earth Society

Flat Earth Discussion Boards => Flat Earth Q&A => Topic started by: msu320 on October 14, 2006, 08:02:47 PM

Title: FAQual error:
Post by: msu320 on October 14, 2006, 08:02:47 PM
You say satellites (man made) don't orbit the earth.
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Q: "What about satellites? How do they orbit the Earth?"

A1: They don't, satellite signals come from radio towers.


But you say other objects can orbit the earth:
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Q: How do seasons work?

The radius of the sun's orbit around the Earth's axis symmetry varies throughout the year, being smallest when summer is in the northern annulus and largest when it is summer in the southern annulus.

Here are some very good diagrams of seasons on the flat Earth. The first is by thedigitalnomad:
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v82/digital_nomad/Flat-Earth.png)




What is the governor of what can orbit and what cannot?
Title: FAQual error:
Post by: Desu on October 14, 2006, 09:50:05 PM
Nothing says man-made satellites can't orbit, just that they don't.
Title: FAQual error:
Post by: qwe on October 15, 2006, 02:20:07 AM
why not?
Title: FAQual error:
Post by: woopedazz on October 15, 2006, 02:23:20 AM
i think ive read something about a dome of protection? or similar? maybe this helps?

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why not?


thinking about it logically: it costs a shitload of money to propel something into space, wen it costs a fraction to put up sum rusty tower with an ariel on it. supposing that they function to similar degrees of productivity
Title: FAQual error:
Post by: holybrain on October 15, 2006, 04:28:12 AM
In an FE, satellites are still possible, but they'd have to keep changing direction so that they wouldn't fly away from the Earth.
Title: FAQual error:
Post by: msu320 on October 15, 2006, 07:32:54 AM
Well now:

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The radius of the sun's orbit around the Earth's axis symmetry varies throughout the year.


Now heres a whole other thing to pick on. Not only does the sun orbit, the radius of it's orbit changes!

how does the sun:
a. Manage to light up approximate half of the world at any given time.
b. manage to stay in orbit.
c. manage to change the radius of the orbit in comparison to the earth's "axis of symmetry" (aka north pole.)

It goes back to the original question.
Title: FAQual error:
Post by: beast on October 15, 2006, 09:05:47 AM
But not an actual error - just something that's not explained.  Like what causes gravity in round Earth theory.