The Flat Earth Society

Flat Earth Discussion Boards => Flat Earth Q&A => Topic started by: Tomm on June 23, 2010, 08:15:19 AM

Title: Time Zones?
Post by: Tomm on June 23, 2010, 08:15:19 AM
Ok, just made an account here and didn't notice a comprehensice explanation in the FAQ for time zones, and can see no possible way for them to occur without the earth being round, as if the world IS flat, then how could half of the world be in shadow and the other in light?

Is there a huge, opaque sheet over half of the world?
This is also flawed, as the 'sheet' would need to move like so: (o being light, I being shade)

From this at say, midnight GMT:

oooooooooooooooooooooIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
oooooooooooooooooooooIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
oooooooooooooooooooooIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

To this at say, 8 AM GMT:

IIIIIIIIoooooooooooooooooooooIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
IIIIIIIIoooooooooooooooooooooIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
IIIIIIIIoooooooooooooooooooooIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

How could this POSSIBLY happen with no round earth, unless the 'sheet' could dematerialise and rematerialise, allowing this shift to occur.
If you have a reasonable explaination I am very willing to hear it, but I will disregard 'materialisation' as there is no sound proof for that yet.

So, an explaination?
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: The Question1 on June 23, 2010, 08:17:22 AM
The sun is smaller and closer.
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: trig on June 23, 2010, 09:10:43 AM
Time zones are not completely wrong in FE "theory", which is not to say they are acceptably explained. The current "explanation" is that the Sun only shines in the directions that curiously would have daylight in the "round Earth" (real science). That is called the "spotlight Sun", which is sort of magical, since it shines all sorts of shapes onto the flat Earth, not possible to reproduce with any kind of spotlights, floodlights, lenses, and mirrors you could buy in a hardware store.

And no, any combination of "sheets" hanging in the sky would not make a really good reproduction of the patterns of daylight in different times of the year, either. They theoretically might cover the Sun at the right times, but the Sun would still appear smaller and weaker at dawn than at midday.
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: iwanttobelieve on June 23, 2010, 04:50:49 PM
The Sun is a floodlight and can shine with a wide band.
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: Thevoiceofreason on June 23, 2010, 10:43:23 PM
Time zones are not completely wrong in FE "theory", which is not to say they are acceptably explained. The current "explanation" is that the Sun only shines in the directions that curiously would have daylight in the "round Earth" (real science). That is called the "spotlight Sun", which is sort of magical, since it shines all sorts of shapes onto the flat Earth, not possible to reproduce with any kind of spotlights, floodlights, lenses, and mirrors you could buy in a hardware store.

And no, any combination of "sheets" hanging in the sky would not make a really good reproduction of the patterns of daylight in different times of the year, either. They theoretically might cover the Sun at the right times, but the Sun would still appear smaller and weaker at dawn than at midday.

but at equinox, the sun shine a semi circle. and any other time, you'd have a bit exposed on the other side, but seeming to come from no where according to FET. Imagine being in the Antarctic winter, in addition to being the only lit place surrounded by darkness, you'd see the sun coming from beyond the edge of the earth.
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: Tomm on June 24, 2010, 12:38:17 AM
The Sun is a floodlight and can shine with a wide band.


I was under the impression that the sun was a glowing ball consisting mainly of hydrogen that was burning at a temperature of ~6.5 million degrees....

The FE "explaination" (quotes are necessary I believe) seems to make no sense at all to me then - thanks trig, although you may be being a tad biased...
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: Thevoiceofreason on June 24, 2010, 03:44:01 AM
The Sun is a floodlight and can shine with a wide band.


that is what the fiftieth time that you have posted that?
you have explained away the size of the sun's projection. what we are asking about is the shape.
are you suggesting that the floodlight can shine more brightly in some areas than others?
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: Sliver on June 25, 2010, 08:01:00 AM
I think the biggest problem with time zones would be that in FET everything south of the equator is much larger than in Round Earth.  This would make the time zones wider, which would mean that somehow time moved at a different rate south of the equator.
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: Thevoiceofreason on June 25, 2010, 03:46:03 PM
I think the biggest problem with time zones would be that in FET everything south of the equator is much larger than in Round Earth.  This would make the time zones wider, which would mean that somehow time moved at a different rate south of the equator.
the cycle would still be 24hour. Bu yeah the spread is a problem, as everything should be colder down there
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: ClockTower on June 28, 2010, 02:55:46 PM
but at equinox, the sun shine a semi circle. and any other time, you'd have a bit exposed on the other side, but seeming to come from nowhere according to FET. Imagine being in the Antarctic winter, in addition to being the only lit place surrounded by darkness, you'd see the sun coming from beyond the edge of the earth.
I confused... Let me try to restate this.

In RET, the Sun shines on exactly half of the Earth at all times (ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects). At the equinox, every location (except the geographic poles) on Earth receives 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark. (The poles receive 24 hours of twilight.) This matches observation.

In FET, the shape of the Sun's illumination on the Earth varies with the season. Yes, on the equinoxes, the illuminated area is a semicircle with the terminator halfway around the disc from the Sun. In June Solstice the illuminated area includes everywhere north of the Arctic Circle throughout the day, but nowhere south of the Antarctic Circle anytime during the day. In the December Solstice, the Sun's illumination includes everywhere south of the Antarctic Circle all day and nowhere north of the Arctic Circle any time during the day.

For the observer south of the Antarctic Circle at midnight on the December Solstice, the Sun appears due south, even though the shortest distance to the Sun would be to the north across the darkness at the North Pole.

Clearly RET has the better explanation.
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: markjo on June 28, 2010, 03:27:24 PM
In RET, the Sun shines on exactly half of the Earth at all times (ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects). At the equinox, every location (except the geographic poles) on Earth receives 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark. (The poles receive 24 hours of twilight.) This matches observation.

Actually, because atmospheric refraction can cause the sun appear higher than it really is, you are not quite correct.  Technically, equal day and equal light is the equilux and can occur up to a few days before or after the equinox, depending on your latitude.
http://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/equinox-equilux-and-twilight-times/
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: ClockTower on June 28, 2010, 04:22:07 PM
In RET, the Sun shines on exactly half of the Earth at all times (ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects). At the equinox, every location (except the geographic poles) on Earth receives 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark. (The poles receive 24 hours of twilight.) This matches observation.

Actually, because atmospheric refraction can cause the sun appear higher than it really is, you are not quite correct.  Technically, equal day and equal light is the equilux and can occur up to a few days before or after the equinox, depending on your latitude.
http://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/equinox-equilux-and-twilight-times/

Hence the reason I said "ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects."
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: markjo on June 28, 2010, 04:42:20 PM
In RET, the Sun shines on exactly half of the Earth at all times (ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects). At the equinox, every location (except the geographic poles) on Earth receives 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark. (The poles receive 24 hours of twilight.) This matches observation.

Actually, because atmospheric refraction can cause the sun appear higher than it really is, you are not quite correct.  Technically, equal day and equal light is the equilux and can occur up to a few days before or after the equinox, depending on your latitude.
http://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/equinox-equilux-and-twilight-times/

Hence the reason I said "ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects."

You also said "this matches observation" when technically, it doesn't.  That's why I say "almost exactly 12 hours" when I use the equinox argument.  lrn2wiggle room
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: ClockTower on June 28, 2010, 05:02:31 PM
In RET, the Sun shines on exactly half of the Earth at all times (ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects). At the equinox, every location (except the geographic poles) on Earth receives 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark. (The poles receive 24 hours of twilight.) This matches observation.

Actually, because atmospheric refraction can cause the sun appear higher than it really is, you are not quite correct.  Technically, equal day and equal light is the equilux and can occur up to a few days before or after the equinox, depending on your latitude.
http://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/equinox-equilux-and-twilight-times/

Hence the reason I said "ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects."

You also said "this matches observation" when technically, it doesn't.  That's why I say "almost exactly 12 hours" when I use the equinox argument.  lrn2wiggle room
Methinks that you need to review the difference between "12" and "12.0". I already haz the wriggleroom.
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: markjo on June 28, 2010, 07:30:07 PM
In RET, the Sun shines on exactly half of the Earth at all times (ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects). At the equinox, every location (except the geographic poles) on Earth receives 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark. (The poles receive 24 hours of twilight.) This matches observation.

Actually, because atmospheric refraction can cause the sun appear higher than it really is, you are not quite correct.  Technically, equal day and equal light is the equilux and can occur up to a few days before or after the equinox, depending on your latitude.
http://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/equinox-equilux-and-twilight-times/

Hence the reason I said "ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects."

You also said "this matches observation" when technically, it doesn't.  That's why I say "almost exactly 12 hours" when I use the equinox argument.  lrn2wiggle room
Methinks that you need to review the difference between "12" and "12.0". I already haz the wriggleroom.
You're new here, aren't you?
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: Nicktra Oldyew on June 28, 2010, 07:34:54 PM
In RET, the Sun shines on exactly half of the Earth at all times (ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects). At the equinox, every location (except the geographic poles) on Earth receives 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark. (The poles receive 24 hours of twilight.) This matches observation.

Actually, because atmospheric refraction can cause the sun appear higher than it really is, you are not quite correct.  Technically, equal day and equal light is the equilux and can occur up to a few days before or after the equinox, depending on your latitude.
http://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/equinox-equilux-and-twilight-times/

Hence the reason I said "ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects."

You also said "this matches observation" when technically, it doesn't.  That's why I say "almost exactly 12 hours" when I use the equinox argument.  lrn2wiggle room
Methinks that you need to review the difference between "12" and "12.0". I already haz the wriggleroom.
You're new here, aren't you?

He must be, as he doesn't seem to hate you as much as everyone else does.
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: Thevoiceofreason on June 29, 2010, 06:23:08 PM
In RET, the Sun shines on exactly half of the Earth at all times (ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects). At the equinox, every location (except the geographic poles) on Earth receives 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark. (The poles receive 24 hours of twilight.) This matches observation.

Actually, because atmospheric refraction can cause the sun appear higher than it really is, you are not quite correct.  Technically, equal day and equal light is the equilux and can occur up to a few days before or after the equinox, depending on your latitude.
http://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/equinox-equilux-and-twilight-times/


cool story, bro
now if you are going to DA, don't
Title: Re: Time Zones?
Post by: markjo on June 29, 2010, 09:05:24 PM
In RET, the Sun shines on exactly half of the Earth at all times (ignoring solar eclipses and atmospheric effects). At the equinox, every location (except the geographic poles) on Earth receives 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark. (The poles receive 24 hours of twilight.) This matches observation.

Actually, because atmospheric refraction can cause the sun appear higher than it really is, you are not quite correct.  Technically, equal day and equal light is the equilux and can occur up to a few days before or after the equinox, depending on your latitude.
http://darkskydiary.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/equinox-equilux-and-twilight-times/


cool story, bro
now if you are going to DA, don't

Who's being a DA?  I'm just trying to clear up a common misconception about the equinox.